Monthly Archives: March 2019

  1. The Advantages of Crimped Can Seals

    A combination of crimped can seals will handle a variety of applications when a rubber lip seal is not your solution.

    Rotary seals are often secured in sealing hardware by crimping the sealing element in a metal can. One of the most common rotary seals is a molded rubber lip seal in a can. 

    While not crimped, the can retains the sealing element, and stops the seal from rotating in the gland. Rotary sealing elements for low pressure (under 15 psi), are often nitrile or Viton rubber sealing elements.

    This style of seal comes in many cross sections, and may include garter springs to help the seal stay engaged with the shaft. These seals are typically low in cost, and produced in high volume.

    These seals are found in many low-pressure applications. However, as the pressures begin to climb over 10 psi and speeds run over 500 ft/min, friction generates heat, which accelerates wear on the rubber element and in turn begins to wear the mating shaft material.crimped can seal

    Overcoming Friction

    Friction or the resultant heat is the largest concern in rotary service.

    The crimped can seal with PTFE (Teflon) elements can run with pressures in excess of 500 Psi and PV (pressure- velocity) reaching over 350,000psi-ft/ min. The crimped can allows these elements to remain secure.

    The crimped case seal causes all the relative motion to remain at the sealing lip interface. With the crimped can, we have the opportunity to install multiple lips or seal cross sections to handle a variety of loads. This allows us to control leakage, and keep friction to a minimum.

    We can seal most any fluid or run dry sealing gases with little or no lubrication. With widely varying temperatures, we can include springs to maintain seal contact, offset some eccentricity of shafts, keep dirt out or keep very light loads.

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  2. Fried Snack Foods and GYLON® Style 3504 Gasket

    Fried Snack Foods and GYLON® Style 3504 Gasket

    The GYLON Style 3504 gasket is made of PTFE with aluminosilicate microspheres. It is designed for use in moderate concentrations of acids, caustics, hydrocarbons, refrigerants, and more.

    It provides a tight seal, improved performance over conventional PTFE, reduced product loss and emissions, reduced creep relaxtion, excellent bolt torque retention, it doesn't burn, will not support bacterial growth, plus many more benefits.

    INDUSTRY

    Food Processing – Fried Snack Foods

    CUSTOMER

    A major diversified food & beverage manufacturer, with facilities located in all regions across the globe.

    BACKGROUND

    The customer had persistent problems when sealing hot oil applications on its bulk snack food fryers across several production sites. Build-up of polymerised vegetable oil on the flanges caused unsightly mess, maintenance complications, financial implications, and posed a significant fire risk.

    CHALLENGES FACED

    As well as ensuring that the sealing material was compliant to FDA and EN1935 standards, the challenge was to ensure that the gaskets would perform well under the difficult conditions presented by the high oil temperatures. Additionally, because the production line was also subject to regular and aggressive cleaning cycles, the gasket material was required to be compatible with other aggressive chemicals across a broad pH range.

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  3. A History Lesson of the Falk Gearbox - How are they Related to Beer?

    Falk Gearbox

    It’s no secret that Falk gearbox parts have powered some of the world’s largest machinery for more than a century. But what most folks don’t realize is that the manufacturer’s legacy was built upon a river of beer.

    That’s right. Before the Falk picture of Falk Gearbox family made its name in the power transmission industry, German immigrant Franz Falk co-founded the fourth-largest brewery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. His success as a brewer helped establish the city as the “beer capital of the world”—and gave his son the wealth he needed to build what would one day become a leading gear manufacturing company.

    From Wisconsin beer to Oregon

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  4. Solving High-Pressure, High Eccentricity Seal Issues

    Facing challenges, head-on is what Vanseal does every day - which is why their customers trust them to deliver tested and proven, material and design solutions that improve the performance of their seals, no matter how tough the environment.

    High-Pressure, High Eccentricity Seal Solution Demonstrates 50% Improvement

    – On pressure and side-load performance of a fluid application

    Recently, a customer was having difficulty with a seal failure on apicture of leoader fluid power application. The high-pressure, high-eccentricity seal operates in conditions up to 200,000 pv at 3000 psi and could not exceed maximum shaft deflection of 0.005″.

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  5. Sealing Solutions for Subsea Systems in the North Sea

    Innovative Subsea Processing Technologies

    The Aasgard oil and gas field in the North Sea has been operating since 1999. Innovative subsea processing technologies were used to compress the oil and gas on the site’s seabed to improve recovery rates as the field ages and as equipment begins to draw from increasingly deeper subsea reservoirs. The operator required seals for the lid and body of the control power distribution unit in order to protect its vital electronics in the harsh, unforgiving subsea environment.

    As a globally trusted source for engineered components, seals, assemblies, and sub-systems for demanding environments, Technetics was uniquely positioned to evaluate and specify a sealing solution for this application. The system designer and Technetics engineers subsequently underwent a two-year testing phase to examine the performance of a variety of sealing options.

    Demanding Subsea Environment

    Due to the extremely demanding environment

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  6. Vesconite Superlube Load Pads Show Little Wear After Two Years

    Six Vesconite Superlube load pads that have been recovered from South African rail parastatal Transnet’s Sishen-Saldanha-line bogies show little wear after two years of use.

    This is according to Dr Jean-Patrick Leger, the CEO of Vesconite Bearings, which makes the polymer load pads that are installed on railway bogies - the metal structures on which the rail wheels and axles are mounted and on which railway vehicles lie.

    “What is interesting is that the samples are hardly worn at all,” he says.

    “We see tiny areas where there is 0.1mm wear, but you can see the original machining marks and machine ridges on most of them.”

    The Vesconite Superlube load pads have been specified for many

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  7. Creating Durable Seals in Glass-Lined Steel Equipment with Gore

    A newly developed gasket tape made by Gore - of expanded polytetrafluorethylene (ePTFE) is specifically designed to address the challenges of creating reliable seals in large glass-lined steel equipment.

    Equipment made of glass-lined steel is used picture of lining glasswhen manufacturing  or processing aggressive chemicals such as aniline derivatives and sulphuric or hydrochloric acid. The Achilles heel of such systems is the gaskets needed to seal the joints between components. Exposure to aggressive media causes the seals to degrade overtime, resulting in damage to equipment and posing a health risk to operators. Replacing the seals costs a great deal of time and effort, with a corresponding drop in production output.

    A newly developed gasket tape made of ePTFE (expanded polytetrafluorethylene) is specifically designed to address the challenges of creating reliable seals in large glass-lined steel equipment.

    Operators of chemical plants choose sealing materials according to a wide range of criteria such as process medium, flange type, sealing performance, pressure and heat resistance, cost and longevity. Other important selection criteria include time required for installation and inventory management. And, of course, a plant operations prior gasket experience weighs in as well. Gaskets for glass-lined-steel equipment are safety-relevant parts because their failure can endanger human lives and/or harm the environment, but they are often treated for administrative purposes as C-class items, that is, parts of minor significance.

    This classification doesn’t reflect the true importance of these sealants. There is a need for more explicit regulations to supplement the general legislation pertaining to occupational health and safety and the handling of hazardous substances. The introduction of a European-wide regulatory basis for establishing detailed, standard processes would be welcome, for instance with respect to approval procedures and safety. As things stand today, companies are obliged to find their own compromise between varying sets of requirements. These include compliance with EU-wide and national directives concerning environmental protection and occupational health and safety. At the same time, companies are making efforts to augment the reliability of their products, simplify inventory management and installation processes, and reduce downtime and overall costs. An added factor in both cases is specific process requirements with respect to temperature, pressure and media.

    SEALING CHALLENGES

    One particular challenge is that of choosing the right sealant for glass-lined steel systems, because these involve the use of aggressive media such as aniline derivatives and sulphuric or hydrochloric acid under demanding conditions. Glass-lined steel presents the advantage of being highly resistant to corrosive and/or abrasive media. Other characteristic features of this material are its smooth surface, which is easy to clean due to its low adhesion properties, and its biologic and catalytic inert behaviour. Nonetheless, it can be difficult to achieve reliable seals in glass-lined steel equipment. This is because the glass lining is more brittle than the metal, and can therefore split or splinter if handled incorrectly. As a result, the gasket load that can be applied to the seal is lower than that for an all-steel flange. Consequently, care must be taken to limit the pressure applied when installing gaskets between interconnecting parts of the system.

    Another problem is that of achieving a reliable seal if the flange surface is uneven or has surface deviations. Once the glass lining has fused, its surface cannot be reworked. The challenges posed by these characteristics of glass-lined steel, combined with the exposure to aggressive chemicals and high temperatures, must be met by the chosen sealant. In practice, these difficult conditions often lead to premature sealing failure and a greater risk of corrosion. The further consequences of sealing failure include leaks and uncontrolled emissions, damage to equipment, high replacement and repair costs, production losses, unplanned maintenance and downtime, and potential risks to employees’ health and safety.

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  8. Lower Friction, Weight, and Emissions - The Freudenberg BlueSeal

    Freudenberg-NOK Sealing Technologies has begun supplying innovative, lightweight radial shaft seals to a major Detroit-based vehicle manufacturer for installation on the V6 and V8 engines powering its newest pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles (SUVs).  Enter the Freudenberg BlueSeal.

    The BlueSeal, part of Freudenberg’s award-winning Low Emission Sealing Solution (LESS) portfolio of engine, transmission and E-Mobility product solutions, provides significant weight, friction and installation advantages over traditional radial shaft seals. Under the contract, Freudenberg-NOK will produce more than 2 million BlueSeals annually. Production is expected to increase further to more than 4 million units annually with orders from additional customers.

    40 percent lighter and 50 percent less space to install

    From turbocharged engines and 10-speed transmissions to

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  9. Using Tekleen Filters for Seawater Filtration on Cruise Ships

    1. Using Filtered Water for Ballast Water Exchange

    Filtered sea water from a ship’s ballast can be released back into the sea, eliminating the potential of unloading non-native and often invasive plants and animals where they don’t belong. Many cruise lines are using on-board filtration to clean their bilge water during the ballast water exchange. By using Tekleen self-cleaning automatic filters, ballast water can be cleaned of debris and solids, thereby preventing animals, vegetation, and floating debris from exiting. Debris can then be collected and disposed of properly.

    2. Pre-Filtering for Potable Water Processing from Sea Water, and Keeping Pipes Clean for Maintenance Minimization

    When used for other purposes to filter water on board, an automatic self-cleaning Tekleen filter can support cooling systems, can pre-filter water for further cleaning and desalination,

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