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The Complete Guide for Mechanical Seals & API 682 4th Edition Piping Plans

Mechanical Seals & API 682 4th Edition

A sealing system, consisting of a mechanical seal and an associated supply system that is balanced by individual applications, is the utmost guarantee for a reliable sealing point and uninterrupted pump service. The performance of the seal is greatly influenced by the environment around the seal faces, making the provision of suitable, clean fluids as well as a moderate temperature an essential topic.

This guiding booklet provides a condensed overview of all piping plans established by the API 682 4th edition guidelines. Each illustrated piping plan is briefly described, and a recommendation that considers the media characteristics in terms of the relevant application and corresponding configurations is given to help you reliably select your sealing system. Furthermore, the content of this booklet has been enriched by providing clues – so-called ‘remarks and checkpoints’ – where EagleBurgmann shares the experiences gained from multiple equipped plants.

Sealing solutions to meet any requirement

Several factors play a major role when choosing the product, the product type, the materials used and how it is operated: process conditions at the sealing location, operating conditions and the medium to be sealed.

No matter what requirements our customers have, EagleBurgmann understands how these factors affect functionality and economic viability, and they translate this expertise into outstanding long-term, reliable sealing solutions. EagleBurgmann has all the expertise needed to manage and support the entire development, life and service cycle of its sealing solutions.

Plan 75 Piping Plan Example

EagleBurgmann and API 682

EagleBurgmann offers customers the widest product portfolio of seals and seal supply systems according to API 682 4th edition. The configurations listed for each individual piping plan are to be understood as recommendations including possible utilizations which may also be applied.

EagleBurgmann Profile

EagleBurgmann is one of the internationally leading companies for industrial sealing technology. Their products are used wherever safety and reliability are important: in the oil and gas industry, refining technology, the petrochemical, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, food processing, power, water, mining, pulp & paper and many others. More than 6,000 employees contribute their ideas, solutions and commitment towards ensuring that customers all over the world can rely on their seals and services. More than 21,000 EagleBurgmann API-seals and systems are installed world-wide.

How AMS3678 Ensures Consistency in Sealing Materials

When it comes to designing and developing seals, the aerospace and industrial industries need a basis to allow production anywhere in the world.

One of the first PTFE (Teflon) standards, AMS3678, describes Teflon and the addition of fillers. This was used in conjunction with Mil-R-8791, which is one of the Mil specs describing a backup ring device.

The origin of all these specs dates back to the creation of the O-ring.

AMS3678The Origin of the O-Ring Patent

In 1939, Niels A. Christensen was granted a U.S. Patent for “new and useful improvements in packings and the like for power cylinders.” These referred to improved packing rings made of “solid rubber or rubber composition very dense and yet possessive of great liveliness and compressibility.” These products were suitable for use as packings for fluid medium pistons (liquid or air). The improved packing ring is the modern O-ring.

There was a progression of standards for the O-rings created by individual countries, such as AS568, BS 1806, DIN 3771, JIS B2401, NF T47-501, and SMS 1586. Eventually, AS568 became more accepted in the industry.

The backup ring was originally created to help improve the O-ring’s ability to resist extrusion. Teflon was widely used as one of the materials for backup ring devices. Standards were created to unify the production of this Teflon device.

The Progression of Mil Specs

The progression of standard changes has led to AMS3678/1 for Virgin PTFE through AMS3678/16. These standards describe a group of Virgin- and filled-PTFE materials accepted by the industry for manufacturing seals and back-up ring devices.

Mil-R-8791 was canceled in February 1982. This spec was superseded with AS8791, which eventually evolved into AMS3678.

AMS3678 is a tool used by customers and Teflon suppliers to create uniformity in the manufacturing and processing of seal and bearing materials. The standard is inclusive of most of the compounds upon which the industry was built.

When customers approach with an old “mil spec”, they are pushed to the new AMS spec which is currently active. Eclipse manufactures to the spec so their customers will have the confidence that they manufacture to a known standard.

When crossing custom materials from well-known sources, customers are driven to an accepted spec that is equivalent to the original source of the material. This helps customers sell their products with internationally-known materials rather than custom, home-grown compounds that are often intended to single source those materials.

There are several qualifications of the spec that suppliers must observe. This includes dimensional stability tests. This test ensures the material has been properly annealed, and that the seal or backup ring will fit and function as it was originally intended.

Eclipse is uniquely qualified to supply parts to the latest AMS3678 specification. They understand the scope of the specification which allows us to ship parts with fully traceable certification.

AMS3678 helps validate a material to a customer to ensure they get the same material processed the same way with each order. Beyond this, there are other ways to determine what makes a part process-capable.

Continue reading How AMS3678 Ensures Consistency in Sealing Materials

A Case Study: GYLON® 3504 and 3545 Gaskets

Wine Manufacturing with GYLON®

Gylon 3504

Picture of Garlock 3545The GYLON® Style 3504 gasket is made of PTFE with aluminosilicate microspheres. It is designed for use in many acids, some caustics, hydrocarbons, refrigerants, and more.

Gylon 3545

The Garlock 3545 style is a highly compressible microcellular PTFE with a rigid PTFE core for improved handlability. Garlock 3545, made with Gylon material, is designed to compress and conform to irregular or damaged surfaces, making it suitable for flanges that generate lower compressive stresses, such and glass-lined flanges and equipment.

INDUSTRY

Food & Beverage – Wine Production

CUSTOMER

An award-winning, family owned & operated winery in the heart of a major US wine-growing region.

BACKGROUND

The customer crushes, presses, ferments, bottles, and labels all of their wines at their winery, but having traditionally utilized EPDM gaskets, they faced ongoing issues with seal reliability. This was occurring during various stages of the winemaking process, but especially so during the sterilization procedures between each batch, with subsequent leaks creating issues in production reliability, housekeeping, and potential contamination.

CHALLENGES FACED

Business was growing rapidly so new equipment had been installed, but at the same time the number of maintenance windows was reducing. Therefore the customer was looking for a more reliable and sanitary product to improve efficiency and help to protect the sensitive product. As well as the need to remain absolutely compliant with industry standards, the customer also placed utmost importance on prevention of any adulteration of their award-winning wine. As well as working around limited windows of opportunity for production trials the critical and expert opinion of wine tasters was therefore essential to ensure full approval of any component change in the process.

Continue reading A Case Study: GYLON® 3504 and 3545 Gaskets

Freudenberg Announces New Seals and Materials for the Aerospace Industry

Freudenberg Sealing Technologies introduced several new material and sealing innovations at the 2019 International Paris Air Show.

These new products are designed to help aerospace customers address ever increasing safety and performance requirements in the industry.

During the June 17-23 event in Paris, Freudenberg showcased a new high temperature, fireproof material; an Omegat OMS-CS cap seal; and new ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) and a fluoroelastomer (FKM) developmental material.

“Our aerospace customers strive continuously to be faster, safer and more efficient, which in turn requires us to innovate to help them reach those goals – a challenge we enthusiastically embrace,” said Vinay Nilkanth, vice president, Global Mobility Sector, Freudenberg Sealing Technologies. “The launch of several new products aimed at improved performance underscores Freudenberg’s commitment to being a global leader and development partner to the industry.”

Freudenberg’s new proprietary fireproof sealing fabric is made to withstand the extremes. Tested on standard aerospace bulb seals and passing AC20-135 fireproof requirements, the fabric acts as a barrier, providing up to 15 minutes for necessary corrective action. The fabric performs as well as other industry standard solutions but is much more cost effective.

Omegat Cap Seal

For use in dynamic, reciprocating applications where low friction is required, the new Omegat OMS-CS cap seal is a two-piece rod seal set consisting of an engineered polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) ring and an O-ring energizer. The seal offers low breakaway and running friction, and is chemically compatible with aerospace fluids and greases. It also provides excellent wear and extrusion characteristics, and has angled blow-by notches and lubrication grooves.

Freudenberg’s new EPDM LM426288 material is for use in low pressure static sealing to -77°C (-106°F) and has excellent resistance to, and swell behavior in, AS1241 phosphate ester hydraulic fluids. The material offers high temperature compression set resistance and short term resistance to 150 °C (302°F) for high temperature hydraulic systems such as hydraulic braking.

The FKM LM426776 material for use in low pressure static sealing to -67°C (-88°F) shows excellent resistance to several aerospace media, including jet turbine and gearbox lubricants, high and low aromatic content jet fuels, and fire resistant hydrocarbon hydraulic fluids. The material offers short-term high temperature resistance to 270°C (518°F) and long-term compression set resistance at 200°C (392°F).


The original article can be found on Freudenberg’s website.

Gallagher Fluid Seals is a preferred distributor of Freudenberg Sealing Technologies. To learn more about Freudenberg products, speak to a Gallagher representative today by calling 1-800-822-4063

Vesconite Bearings – Three Dakar Rallies With No Grease

The Dakar Rally – What is it?

The Dakar Rally (or simply “The Dakar”) is an annual rally raid organized by the Amaury Sport Organisation. Since its inception in 1977, most races took place from Paris, France, to Dakar, Senegal. But due to security threats in Mauritania, which led to the cancellation of the 2008 rally, races since 2009 have been held in South America. The race is open to both amateur and professional entries, of which amateurs typically comprise of eighty percent of all participants.

The race is an off-road endurance event. The terrain that the competitors traverse is much tougher than that used in conventional rallying, and the vehicles used are true off-road vehicles rather than modified on-road vehicles. Most of the competitive special sections are off-road, crossing dunes, mud, camel grass, rocks, and erg among others. The distances of each stage covered vary from short distances up to 800–900 kilometres (500–560 mi) per day.

Vesconite Hilube Bushings in Suspensions of Colcar’s Racing Team Vehicles

Colcar Racing Team is a partner of Vesconite, and used the no-grease Hilube busings in the suspensions of their racing vehicles during the 2019 Dakar Rally.

The use of Vesconite Hilube in the Argentinian team’s vehicles builds on a growing record of Vesconite Hilube use in their yearly Dakar entries.

In 2018, Vesconite Hilube bushings were fitted to two trucks, one of which finished in position 23. In 2017, meanwhile, the Argentinian team finished in 33rd position, and continued to use their Vesconite Hilube bushings for two other local competitions that covered a total distance equivalent to three Dakar Rallies.

For the 2019 Dakar Rally, Colcar Racing Team participated in the truck category (vehicles weighing more than 3,500 kg – or 7,700 lbs), as well as the utility vehicle (UTV) category, also known as four-wheel side-by-side vehicle or recreational off-highway vehicle category.

The Colcar UTV won its category and finished 18 overall.

Colcar Racing Team's VehicleVesconite’s polymer bushings put to the test in the 9,000 km race

“The polymer bushings have proven themselves over the grueling annual 9,000 km multi-country South American Dakar endurance race that covers various terrains, including sand dunes, mountains and salt flats,” comments Leandro Panzini of VesArg, the Argentinian distributor of the Vesconite Hilube.

“Suspension bushings are important in vehicle safety, ride comfort and handling and also align suspension and steering components … and they are paramount in the Dakar, in which vehicles travel at between 100 and 200 kilometers per hour (62-124mph) in all kinds of terrain over 15 days,” he says.

In the Dakar vehicles, the bushings were exposed to an oscillating movement with many cycles per minute taking place, and performed much better than the nylon-molybdenum bushings that they replaced, reports Panzini, who is proud to have Vesconite Hilube associated with this historic race and performing so well each year in race vehicles.

Watch the video below about the Colcar team during this year’s Dakar Rally:


Gallagher is a distributor of Vesconite products for all industries.  If you have questions about using Vesconite in any application, contact our engineering department.

EagleBurgmann Shaft Seals in Waste Paper Treatment

Waste paper treatment is of great significance in the paper industry. The collected and sorted waste paper is fiberized in pulpers using large amounts of water with the addition of chemicals and is sorted into slightly and heavily contaminated fractions.

In the de-inking process, the printing ink is removed by means of chemicals and mechanical forces and is skimmed as foam from the surface in the subsequent flotation.

The risk of dry running for the mechanical seal is especially great for the machines used in the flotation process. The seals in the coarse screening are subjected to intense stress due to the contaminations inclined to plaiting. Know-how and experience in the selection of seals and materials are requirements in order to ensure optimal and trouble-free operation.

The shafts of bleaching agent pumps, MC pumps, dispersers, slurry pumps, sorters, pulpers and fiberizers are successfully equipped with EagleBurgmann single and double seals of the LP, M7N, M74, HR and Cartex-DN series. Thermoflon and Buramex type compression packings reliably seal bleaching agent pumps and separators in the waste paper treatment process.

Waste Paper Treatment Process

Waste Paper Treatment Process


Successful Mechanical Seals for Waste Paper Treatment Facilities

Kartonsan Turkey PumpsIn Kartonsan Turkey, numerous pumps for pulp treatment and in the de-inking system have been successfully equipped with EagleBurgmann Burasoft 6225-L type compression packings.


UPM Kymmene ShottonAt UPM Kymmene Shotton in England, nine Voith pressure screens in waste paper treatment are being used successfully with EagleBurgmann HR-D type double cartridge seals. Medium to be sealed: Pulp fibers 1.5 … 4 % abs. dry and water, p = 8 bar (116 PSI), t = max. 40 °C (104 °F).


Palm Worth GermanyIn the waste paper treatment at Palm in Wörth, Germany, four TL200/TL300 type Metso Screens with LP-D-ST-D15/130-DE were retrofitted to non-flow operation and have been running in continuous operation (24 hrs./day) since 2004. Medium: Pulp 3 % abs. dry and water, t = 50 °C (122 °F), p3 = 4 bar (58 PSI), n = 800 min-1.


Stora Enso Maxau GermanyAt Stora Enso Maxau, Germany, Voith slot sorters in a waste paper treatment plant for the production of standard and upgraded newsprint paper are sealed with EagleBurgmann HR10 type seals (“dead-end”). Flushing with circuit water (return water) is used only when the medium has a too high solids content. Face material combination SiC/SiC, shaft diameter d1 = 46 … 130 mm (1.81” … 5.12”), p1 = 1 bar (15 PSI), t = 60 °C (140 °F), n = 980 min-1, medium: Paper pulp (0.2 … 5 % abs. dry). The Palm Paper Ltd. paper mill produces newsprint for national and international newspapers. Production is based solely on waste paper pulp.


Palm Papter Ltd. TotalSealCare Service AgreementA TotalSealCare service agreement having a duration of several years includes servicing of all installed mechanical seals for pulp pumps, mixers and various pressure screens. Additional contractually agreed services are on-site presence during start-ups, troubleshooting and providing seal-related schooling and training courses for plant personnel.


To Learn more about which seal might be right for your application, contact us today at 1-800-822-4063 or click the button below.

Contact Gallagher

A Closer Look at Parco’s 4200 Nitrile Seals

Nitrile (NBR) is a copolymer of butadiene and acrylonitrile. Due to its excellent resistance to petroleum products and its ability to be compounded for service over a temperature range of -30°F to +250°F, Nitrile /NBR is the most widely used elastomer in the seal industry today. NBR o-rings are very versatile, inexpensive material which contributes to its wide array of applications.

Let’s start with the 4200-70 General-Purpose Nitrile Seal. What differentiates this material?

1. Excellent Physical Properties

Parco’s 4200-70 70-durometer nitrile O-rings have excellent physical properties. For nearly 40 years, 4200-70 O-rings have been used in a wide variety of  applications with great results. So when you specify 4200-70, rest assured that you’ve made the right choice.

2. Excellent Resistance to Compression Set

To perform properly, seals must resist taking a set from compression after being installed. When a seal takes a set, it no longer exerts force on the mating surfaces, resulting in leakage. A compound with low compression set, like 4200-70, better maintains its elastomeric properties and original thickness, preserving seal integrity. Seals made from Parco’s 4200-70 compound provide excellent resistance to compression set. After testing 4200-70 for 22 hours at 212°F, it had a compression set of only 6 percent.

Compression Set of a Typical Parker 70-Duro Compound

3. Very Good Resistance to a Variety of Fluids

NBR O-ring compounds, like 4200-70, provide very good service in gasoline, crude oil, power steering fluid, hexane, toluene, water, water-based hydraulic fluids, and dilute bases such as sodium hydroxide.

So, what’s the chemical resistance of 4200-70?

  • Automatic Transmission Fluid
  • Crude Oil
  • Gasoline
  • Propane
  • Water

More than 50 percent of sealing needs can be met using nitrile. Its versatile nature might be right for your application and you don’t even know it. Consider NBR before opting for something more complex!


About Parco

Founded in 1941, Parco was the first manufacturer to specialize in O-rings, still one of its primary products. Today, Parco has four modern facilities manufacturing O-rings, custom-molded elastomeric seals, rubber-to-metal bonded parts, and machined metal parts. Their 154,000 square-foot facility in Ontario, California is one of the largest plants in the world making molded rubber seals. The three other facilities in Texas and Louisiana specialize in complex custom-molded elastomeric products, machined metal parts, and machined plastics.


The datasheet for Parco’s 4200-70 can be found by clicking here.

Gallagher Fluid Seals is an authorized distributor for Parco. For more information, contact our engineering department.

How to Handle Corrosion in Your Mill

Avoiding as Much Unplanned Downtime as Possible

Steel mill operators don’t like to have downtime problems, in fact they can’t afford to.  They want to run as much as possible, and as efficiently as possible.  Production equals dollars.  As problems pop up that cause unplanned downtime or upset production (and subsequently get addressed) over the years, they’ve driven the industry to continue to change and evolve as a whole.  So the mills of today don’t have the same issues that mills did in the past.  You can’t as easily say “Hey, we saw this exact same problem up the street on their furnace!” the way you may have been able to 50 years ago.

That doesn’t mean that mills still don’t run into issues, they just tend to be a bit more personalized. And when you have a unique issue, you tend to get a unique solution.  A mill will do its best to solve its own problems, yet each mill has their own idiosyncrasies.  When these “little” problems pop up, the mill has to find a way to deal with it.  When it comes to problem-solving in mills, there are two main schools of thought: get to the real core of the problem and fix it as completely as possible for a lasting solution, or stabilize the issue and control it through regular coordinated maintenance.  Both strategies have the same end goal: avoid as much unplanned downtime as possible by solving the problem.  But which strategy is correct?

A Lasting Solution vs Regular Coordinated Maintenance

This is seen all the time with hoses and expansion joints.  To illustrate this issue, let’s use two real-life examples: Mill A and Mill B were both using Hose Master’s Annuflex hose assemblies to transfer cooling water on the caster and experiencing similar hose failures due to corrosion from an unknown source. Both Mills had seen unplanned downtime due to the failure of these hoses, but each had a different philosophy on how to solve to the problem.

picture of steel mill“Mill A” takes the long-term calculated approach.  They analyze it, looking at everything regarding the application to isolate the underlying issue.  Surrounding piping, surrounding equipment, the hose construction, the media inside the hose…and discover that the mold powder being used during the casting is mixing with cooling water spray, and floating down onto the outside of the hoses, causing them to corrode.  In the short term, they made piping adjustments and redesigned their Annuflex hose assemblies to be made out of ChemKing which uses a nobler alloy (Hastelloy C276) to resist the corrosion, and add an external guard to help prevent particulate from coming into contact with the hose in the first place.  They then plan to install a metal shield around the casting segment where the mold powder is originating to prevent it from escaping and damaging the surrounding equipment in the future.  This solution is more time consuming and more expensive, but the issue is solved for good and removes the need for regular maintenance!

“Mill B” sees the same problem for what it is at face value: just a hose failure.  Because the hoses have been allowed to stay in service for an extended period of time, they seek to remedy the maintenance issue of hoses failing unexpectedly. Because the mill has a planned maintenance outage every 6 months, scheduling the hoses to be replaced regularly at this time will remove the issue of unplanned failures.  In order to increase the service life and guarantee performance in-between the planned maintenance outages, they make the lateral switch from Annuflex to Masterflex.  The added flexibility ensures that all the assemblies they use on the caster will be flexible enough regardless of the slight differences in piping configuration,  and that the hoses will not fail due to fatigue. The standard alloy construction can withstand the corrosion long enough to survive between outages, so by replacing them all at once they now have taken control of the service life issue.  Because of the more economical construction, they can easily afford to replace the hoses at their planned intervals and avoid any further lost production!

So, Which Solution is Right?

Well – both are right. Each mill found a way to keep their production up-and-running that makes sense to them. The hose issue plays a very small part in the overall production flow of the mill, and how they strategize and organize their overall approach to maximizing production and uptime takes into account a huge number of variables.  When helping to solve these problems, manufacturers like Hose Master have to take these differences into account.  There’s more than one way to skin a cat; and what may work for one mill, may be an unacceptable solution in another.


The original article was written by Erik Kane and can be found on Hosemaster’s website.

Gallagher Fluid Seals is a preferred distributor of HoseMaster. To learn more about how we can help with your MRO solutions, contact Gallagher today.

Parker’s EM163-80 Meets Both NAS1613 Revision 2 and 6, Is There a Difference?

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.

Original content can be found on Parker’s Website and was written by Dorothy Kern, applications engineering manager for the Parker O-Ring & Engineered Seals Division.


Perhaps you know Parker’s newest EPDM material is EM163-80. Featuring breakthrough low temperature functionality, resistance to all commercially available phosphate ester fluids, and the ability to be made into custom shapes, extrusions, and spliced geometries, EM163-80 represents the best-in-class material for applications needing to seal phosphate-ester-based fluids. The latest news is that EM163-80 meets the full qualification requirements of both NAS1613 Revision 6 (code A) and the legacy Revision 2 (no code). Parker has been inundated with questions about the specification differences between Revision 6 and 2, enough that it makes sense to devote a blog topic explaining the fluids, conditions, and dynamic cycling requirements which are required to qualify EM163-80 to each specification.

The easiest part of this comparison is evaluating the areas of Revision 6 which are very much a copy and paste from Revision 2. Compression set conditions, aged and un-aged, plus temperature retraction requirements, aged and un-aged, are identical. Lastly, both specifications require a test to verify the elastomers will not corrode or adhere to five different metal substrate materials. That is pretty much where the similarities end.  Now for the contrasts.

Specimen size

The first subtle difference is the specimen size. Both specs require testing to measure the change in physical properties and volume following a heated immersion in phosphate ester fluids. For the most part, No Code qualification requires testing to be completed on test slabs or O-rings, while the newer revision, Code A, requires testing on test slabs AND O-rings. Not a big difference, but still, a difference.

The fluid conditions are very similar in both specs, but not identical. There are only two temperatures for the short term 70 hour exposure: 160°F and 250°F. Another similarity is that the longer soaks are at 225°F for 334 and 670 hours. The more difficult A Code also requires 1000 and 1440 hours at 225°F. We begin to see the requirements for the later revision are more reflective of the industry conditions, right?

Fluids

Next, we look at the fluids, which truly are a key difference between the two documents. Revision 2 fluid is exclusively for AS1241 Type IV, CL 2 while revision 6 states the elastomers must meet “all commercially available AS1241 Type IV, Class 1 and 2, and Type V”. Table 1 outlines the AS1241 fluids in context of both NAS 1613 revisions.

Revision 2 Revision 6
Low Density Hyject IV A Plus AS 1241 Type IV class 1 X
Low Density Skydrol LD4 AS 1241 Type IV class 1 X
High Density Skydrol 500B-4 AS 1241 Type IV class 2 X X
Low Density Skydrol V AS 1241 Type V X
Low Density Hyjet V AS 1241 Type V X
Low Density Skydrol PE-5 AS 1241 Type V X

Basically, to pass Revision 6, the material must demonstrate compatibility for all six commercially available fluids, while Revision 2 only has one fluid which is must be verified for compatibility. Again, we see Revision 6 is much more comprehensive than Revision 2.

Endurance Testing

picture of o-ringsLast, we look at the functional testing of the materials, referred to as dynamic or endurance testing. Both specifications require endurance testing on a pair of seals, which have been aged for a week at 225°F. The appropriate fluids are outlined in the table above.

Revision 2 has a gland design per Mil-G-5514. There is a 4” stroke length and the rod must travel 30 full cycles each minute. The rod is chromium plated with a surface finish between 16-32 microinches. PTFE anti-extrusion back up rings are necessary for the 3000 psi high pressure cycling. A temperature of 160°F is maintained for 70,000 strokes and then increased to 225°F for an additional 90,000 strokes.

Revision 6 has a much more demanding endurance test with fives phases and slightly different hardware. The rod must be a smooth 8 to 16 microinches Ra with a cross-hatched finish by lapping, and the cycle is 30 complete strokes per minute but only 3” rather than 4”, which means the speed can be more conservative. A pair of conditioned seals are placed in AS4716 grooves, adjacent to a PTFE back up ring. Similarities to Rev 2 are that there is a pressure of 3000 psi for the dynamic cycling at both 160°F and 225°F, however before and after each high temperature cycle there is a low temperature, -65°F soak. The first soak is static for 24 hours, followed by the 160°F high pressure cycling. The second low temperature soak requires 10 dynamic cycles at ambient pressure followed by 10 cycles at 3000 psi. The final low temperature soak requires one hour static sealing at 3000 psi followed by an 18 hour warm down period.

If you read carefully through the tests, you begin to see the Revision 6 seals must go through a more rigorous test with harsh low temperature, low pressure conditions. However, Revision 2 is not without its own challenges. The required hardware configuration; ie, low squeeze and more rough surface finish, is far from optimum and not what we recommend in actual service conditions. Added to the difficulty is the longer stroke length and faster speed. The fact that EM163-80 has passed both specifications proves it is the next generation EPDM seal material ready for flight.


Gallagher Fluid Seals is an authorized distributor of Parker. To learn more about how Gallagher Fluid Seals can help you, contact our engineering department at 1-800-822-4063

Orion Engineered Seals “Pneumatic Sealing Device”

orion pneumatic sealing deviceThe Orion Engineered Seals pneumatic sealing device (PSD) is an engineered pneumatic sealing system designed to seal the shafts of machines where typical contact seals such as packing and/or mechanical face seals prove to be too costly to operate and maintain.

PSD Sealing system features:

  • Efficient design minimizes air usage while maintaining internal sealing pressure profile
  • Resilient to angular and parallel shaft movement
  • Pressures /temperatures to 120psi/575oF
  • Split seals available in most designs
  • Wide range of materials available covering most application requirements
  • Requires little or no maintenance after installation

How the Pneumatic Sealing Device Works

The pressure profile forms a circumferential boundary layer internally that mitigates the effects of shaft movement because the throttle is designed to float. The standard PSD is designed so the air flow in/out of the seal is biased at 50% as can be seen in the image below. Installed correctly the PSD is essentially a non-contact seal which is why it requires no maintenance. In those situations where there is angular misalignment OES PSD-AM design is utilized. In all cases the PSD is engineered to meet our customers specific requirements and performance expectations.

Profile of Pneumatic Sealing Device

The PSD relies on engineered clearances to develop a uniform sealing pressure/velocity profile. This eliminates low pressure areas mitigating the chance of product ingress into the seal. This can be seen in the pressure profile map from a CFD analysis of the PSD.

how it works pneumatic sealing device Orion


Who is Orion Engineered Seals?

Orion Engineered Seals is a customer-focused organization specializing in innovative bearing protection and product sealing technology.

They provide quick delivery of all our off-the-shelf products for common industrial applications and have the application expertise and resources to solve complex sealing problems.


The original content and specifications can be found on Orion Engineered Seals’ website here.

Gallagher Fluid Seals is a preferred distributor of Orion Seals. For more information on Pneumatic Sealing Devices or to speak with an engineer, contact Gallagher Fluid Seals.