Kalrez® 1050LF General Purpose FFKM

kalrez 1050LFDuPont™ Kalrez® 1050LF perfluoroelastomer parts are a carbon black-filled general-purpose product for o-rings, seals, and other parts used in chemical process industries. It is a classic-grade and longtime favorite for premium performance and provides a more economical option than similar compounds such as 7375.

Kalrez 1050LF o-rings can maintain their recovery with elasticity following high-pressure applications, maintaining a tighter seal for longer periods of time compared to other compounds. With a pressure rating of 1,500 PSI, it can help extend seal life and integrity, ultimately lowering costs.

With above-average hot water and steam resistance, the maximum application temperature for 1050LF is approximately 550°F (up to 288°C). This compound is also known for its excellent amine resistance and compression set properties. It has a Shore A durometer of 82.

In addition, Kalrez 1050LF has excellent chemical resistance, with the ability to withstand contact of over 1,800 different chemicals, plasmas, and solvents.

In particular, this compound stands out for wet applications in semiconductor manufacturing – stripping and copper plating, which include:

  • Door/lid seals
  • Drain seals
  • Seals for chemical containers
  • Fittings
  • Seals for filters/connectors
  • Flow meters

This reliable compound from DuPont is classified as a general usage product. It is not recommended for use in organic or inorganic acids as high temperatures and is not recommended for applications that require rapid temperature cycling properties.


For more information about Kalrez 1050LF, or to see if it is a good fit for your application, contact Gallagher Fluid Seals today.

Gallagher Fluid Seals is an authorized distributor for DuPont™ Kalrez®.

Vesconite Bushings Ensure Glue Pump Restarts Successfully After Down Time

One of Vesconite’s customers, a large independent polyurethane and plastic foam manufacturer, restarted an important gear pump without difficulty after the company’s closed period from December through January. This gear pump is used to pump glue to rebound foam chips.

Because it pumps viscous adhesive liquid at one of the company’s two chip plants, the gear pump can fail to restart if component parts are immobilized by glue after a long period of inactivity.

Viking Pump Restarts With Ease With Hilube

However, with the introduction of Vesconite Hilube polymer bushings in the well-known Viking internal gear pump, the company’s pump restarted with ease.

Vesconite HilubeNot only that, the Vesconite Hilube pump bushings, which were inspected at the time of the restart, showed no wear.

The foam manufacturer service manager noted that the self-lubricating hard-wearing Vesconite Hilube polymer bushings replaced carbon graphite ones, which had tended to crack in the warm operating environment, in which the viscous glue-like chemicals needed to be heated to be applied to the foam chips.

This did not occur with the Vesconite Hilube, which had the added advantage of being self-lubricating and being able to move in the high-friction environment.

“You can’t use an ordinary plastic bush,” says the service manager.

The gum dries out and sticks to the bush if you try. After the December break and after long weekends, the gear pumps ceased to operate before we used Vesconite Hilube.

The company manufacturers 800 tons per year of chip mattress blocks, which are used for bus seats, gymnasium mats, restaurant seats, mattresses, and other high-density furniture/bedding applications.

The service manager said that the Vesconite Hilube bushing was currently on it’s eight month, and is pleased it has survived and continued to operate after the holiday period.

He has installed Vesconite Hilube bushings on several gear pumps at the factory, including several pumps where temperatures can reach 65°C.

He believes that this is a low-maintenance solution for a challenging operating environment.


For the original article, visit Vesconite’s website.

Gallagher Fluid Seals is an authorized distributor for Vesconite products. For information or to see if it is a right fit for your application, contact us today.

Reduce Downtime and Costly Seal Replacements: Seal Failure Diagnosis Part 1

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.

Original content can be found on Parker’s Website and was written by William Pomeroy, applications engineer, Parker O-Ring & Engineered Seals Division.


There are many situations where an O-Ring may not last as long as one thinks that it should. When the expectation is realistic and yet the seal fails earlier than expected, Applications Engineering teams are often asked to help discover the seal failure mode(s).

Seal failure is often due to a combination of failure modes, making root cause difficult to uncover. When beginning a failure analysis, items usually asked for include: hardware information, how the seal is installed, application conditions (temp, fluids, and pressure exposure), and how long into the service that the seal failed. These details help bring the overall application into focus and enable a quick diagnosis to help resolve seal failures. In part one of the seal failure blog series, we will discuss compression set, extrusion, and spiral failure.

Compression set

  • picture of compression setCompression set is likely the most common failure mode for elastomer seals. Compression can be defined, or rather quantified, by the seals ability to return to its original shape after compression is removed. Zero percent compression set indicates that no relaxation (permanent deformation) has occurred, while 100% compression set indicates that total relaxation (seal no longer applies a force on the mating surface). When investigating material options, note that the lower the % compression set for a given compound, the more resilient the material is. However, it is extremely important to ensure you are making equal comparison in terms of time and temperature for the test conditions.
  • There are many potential causes for compression set.
    • Poor material properties
    • Improper gland
    • Fluid incompatibility
    • Temperature exposures above the recommended range for the material.

Extrusion and Nibbling

  • picture of extrusionThe driving force (pun intended) for this failure mode is the pressure load that the seal is exposed to. Extrusion most often occurs when a seal material deforms into the space between the bore and the outside of the tube (commonly referred to as the extrusion gap or “E-gap”). An approximation for the pressure rating for a seal can be determine by evaluating figure 3-2 of the Parker O-Ring handbook. The X-axis shows the size of the clearance gap (total gap, or diametral gap), and the Y-axis is the pressure load. The curves on the chart correspond to the hardness of the rubber. Extrusion can also occur due to gland overfill, when the deformation from compression of the seal fills the entire groove and lips over into the extrusion gap.
  • Face seals do not usually have an extrusion gap, so this orientation can achieve much higher pressure loads than a radial seal. Without a gap for the seal to extrude into, the risk of significant extrusion is highly diminished.
  • Extrusion in radial seals can by combated by reducing the clearance gap or by adding a back up ring.

Spiral Failure

  • picture of spiral failureSpiral failure can be more simply described as the O-Ring rolling in the groove. This failure more is most common in dynamic reciprocating O-Ring applications. However, spiral failure can also occur during installation. An image of spiral failure is unique, and relatively easy to diagnose, but the root cause of spiral failure can sometimes be difficult to pinpoint. Uneven surface finish, poor lubrication, side loading, eccentricity, or perhaps stroke speed can all contribute to spiral failure.

Check out Parker’s neat video about Seal Failure Modes:

Parker and Gallagher Fluid Seals can help diagnose seal failures and the best sealing solutions for your application.

Stay tuned for Part 2 in this series.


For more information about how Gallagher Fluid Seals can help you, contact our engineering department today.

Gore Joint Sealant vs Gore Gasket Tape: Which Should You Use?

Created more than 40 years ago, Gore Joint Sealant was the first form-in-place gasket. It was and still is a great sealing solution for steel flanges with large diameters, irregular shapes, or rough/pitted surfaces. It forms a thin yet strong seal when compressed and works in applications where bolt loads are low.

Gore Gasketing Joint SealantWith a reliable, easy install and being a cost-effective sealing method, it’s become standard seal for MRO applications all over the world. Installing it is very easy, too: Simply peel off the adhesive backing, apply it to the flange, and overlap the ends. Voila, you have an immediate custom gasket for your unique flange shape.

Looking at Gore Joint Sealant, you may notice it looks strikingly similar to other Gore products, such as Gore 500 Series or Gore 1000. So, what makes them different, and what is the right choice for your application?

The Difference Between Gore Joint Sealant and Gore Gasket Tape Series 500

Simply put, the main decision factor for customers looking at Gore Gasket Tape products vs Joint Sealant is thermal performance. Gasket Tape Series 500 Tape has a much more expansive thermal range.

  • Gore Joint Sealant’s operating range is for temperatures between -60°C to 150°C (-76°F to 300°F).
  • Gore Gasket Tape Series 500 has a typical operating range between -60°C to 230°C (-76°F to 445°F).
    • It also has a maximum use from -269°C to 315°C (-452°F to 600°F).

Both products have excellent chemical resistance to all media pH 0-14 except molten alkali metals and elemental fluorine.

GORE Gasket Tape Series 500Joint sealant’s strength is derived from its fibers, not nodes. It’s made from 100% expanded PTFE with a monodirectional strength. Gasket Tape Series 500 is also made of 100% ePTFE but has multidirectional strength, making it less “squishy,” but much stronger.

For many applications, Joint Sealant would work just fine. For example, the Pulp & Paper industry generally works really well for Joint Sealant applications. There’s no need for Series 500 in their flanges due to the nature of processing at the facility. However, more demanding applications typically use the Series 500 or even Series 1000 Tape.

Speaking of Gore Gasket Tape Series 1000, what makes it different than the other two?

The Difference Between Gore Gasket Tape Series 500 and Gore Gasket Tape Series 1000

Gore Gasket Tape Series 1000 is a sealant that is excellent for particularly challenging applications, such as glass-lined steel equipment. Typical users of this product are chemical processors who deal with aggressive media under demanding conditions. These types of applications frequently have challenging and varying conditions – high temperatures, alternating pressures, low gasket loads, or deviations in surfaces. The main thing that differentiates Gore Series 1000 Tape from Gore Series 500 is the proprietary barrier core. This core helps to maintain the seal even at very low loads.

Gore’s Gasket Tape Series 1000 has an engineered core to amplify the available load. This helps create a seal more than 10X tighter than other ePTFE gasket tapes. Because of this, it delivers exceptional sealing reliability over time and process cycles relative to other ePTFE gasket tapes. It allows for more uptime and runtime periods, enabling longer maintenance cycles.

No matter the type of process media – – Gore has a solution to help you quickly seal challenging applications.

Still not sure which Gore product might be right for you? Check out this simple flow chart to see which one is best for you:

gore product flow chart picture


Gallagher Fluid Seals is an authorized distributor of Gore products, which include Joint Sealant, Gasket Tapes, UPG gaskets, and more. For more information or to see if Gore might be a good fit for you, contact us today.

Evolving from Plastic to Teflon Seals

The term “plastics” is generic way of describing a synthetic material made from a wide range of organic polymers. Organic polymers describes a man-made substance that is formulated using polymer chains to create what we commonly refer to as…(you guessed it), plastics.

Before plastic, leather had been used to create Backup ring devices behind O-rings. Leather allows fluids to be retained, providing lubrication for the O-ring when the system was running dry.

picture of teflonThe problem with leather was that it could become dry and shrink away from the sealing service, exposing the elastomer to same pressure it was intended to protect against.

With the advent of polymers, a piece of plastic could be cut or formed into the exact shape to allow for zero extrusion gap, and for continued protection for the O-ring.

Some polymers were very brittle. Since they needed to be deformed to allow for installation into solid glands, the cut of the plastic could nibble at the O-ring, causing premature failure of the element it was supposed to be protecting.

The Revolution of PTFE

When PTFE moved out of the lab and into industrial use, it quickly found itself adjacent to the O-ring. PTFE offers extrusion resistance and, at the same time, doesn’t erode or nibble at the O-ring due to the “softness” of the polymer.(Hardness between 55 and 65 Shore D)

Given the composition of PTFE, or Teflon, it could be utilized as a sealing element to protect Backup rings and conform to the shaft. The bonus was it was generally easy on shafts (depending on the filler added to the PTFE).

There are some negative aspects to Teflon that needed to be overcome by early engineers. First, it has a fairly high rate of Thermal expansion which, by its own nature, could often times lose contact with the sealing surface. This meant some kind of loading was necessary to ensure contact.

PTFE is as tough as other polymers, so the fact that it could seal on a shaft made it vulnerable during installation for tears or nicks on sealing surface.

Second, if it were stretched during installation, the material had to be sized back to its original shape due to its poor elastic properties. Continue reading Evolving from Plastic to Teflon Seals

Don’t Get Burned with the Wrong Hydraulic Hose

picture of hot cokeIn modern steelmaking, heat rules. Heat changes coal into coke, melts ore into liquid iron, and converts iron into steel. All of these products must be transported from one process to the next, and hydraulic power units (HPUs) are employed to provide that power. Hydraulic hoses provide flexible connections between the HPUs and the equipment they power, and this is where problems can arise. Heat and hydraulics do not mix, and hydraulic power systems can experience premature hose failures unless a proactive approach is taken.

Most steel is made using one of two processes. The first is an Electric Arc Furnace (EAF), which uses scrap steel as the main feedstock. The scrap is charged into the furnace, where huge electrodes create an arc of electricity that melts the charge so it can then be refined and processed into the desired alloy. The second process is an integrated mill, where Blast Furnaces supply liquid iron to a Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF). Blast Furnaces primarily use coke, iron ore, and limestone as feedstock.

Worldwide, the Blast Furnace/Basic Oxygen Furnace (BF/BOF) process accounts for 3/4 of all steel produced, while in the U.S.A. this process only accounts for only about a third of steelmaking capacity. The majority of steel made in the U.S. is produced using EAFs, due to the economies they provide. Nevertheless, integrated mills won’t disappear any time soon, so it’s important to understand where hoses work…and where they can fail.

Before Coke, There Was Coal

In an integrated steel mill, liquid iron is the precursor of refined steel. Liquid iron is made in a blast furnace, using iron ore, limestone, and coke. This coke is produced using a special grade of coal called metallurgical coal, or coking coal. Metallurgical coal is usually a blend of coal from various sources, in order to achieve the correct content of energy, ash, and moisture. This coal is then conditioned and put into coke ovens, where multiple ovens are typically positioned side-by-side, forming a coke oven battery. The coal is then heated without consuming it completely by controlling the air intake. This converts the coal into hard, porous, carbon-rich coke.
The doors to the coke ovens, the dampers controlling air intake, and the mechanism that pushes the coke out of the oven are typically operated using hydraulics, and if the hot coke falls onto a rubber or thermoplastic hydraulic hose, bad things can happen. Corrugated metal hydraulic hoses are great for this application, as they resist the effects of orange-hot coke, and provide the best combination of high working pressures and great flexibility, all at a great value.

Quench Your Thirst

Once this coke is ready for use, it is pushed out of the coke oven and taken to a quenching tower for cooling. Special rail cars called quench cars are used to take the hot coke to the quench tower, where it is cooled using water or an inert gas, such as nitrogen. The cooled coke is then released from the quench car using hydraulically actuated dumping mechanisms, where hose damage can occur if hot coke drops onto the hydraulic hoses. Some systems use mechanical conveying systems to transfer the coke to the quenching mechanism, and high ambient heat conditions may be present here as well. Metal hoses provide rugged resistance to these extreme operating environments.

When It’s Hot

Moving on to the steelmaking side of things, there are many more applications where metal hoses outperform non-metallic options, from the conversion furnaces to the casters to hot strip mills. Whether conveying water, steam, or hydraulic fluid, corrugated metal hose provides long-lasting, worry-free service in hot, corrosive conditions. Metal hoses do not suffer from cracking or blistered covers like rubber hoses can, and don’t have any permeation issues. Metal hose assemblies feature a welded construction, providing fire resistance and positive fitting retention. External covers can be added to protect metal hose from molten splash. Insulating sleeves can be used to protect the media being conveyed from high ambient heat radiating from newly-cast steel. Metal expansion joints can replace cooling hoses on the EAF roof, reducing failures and leaks. High-pressure hoses like our PressureMax HP are great for hydraulic electrode clamping systems, pinch rolls, and descaling hoses. The list goes on and on.

Hose Master is the industry expert in solving the toughest applications in the harshest environments. We can help you identify problems in the field, but we don’t stop there. Our application expertise, engineering assistance, and expansive product line maximize service life, reliability, and safety. When the heat is on, let Hose Master help you by providing the best products with unbeatable service. Give us a call today.


The original article was written by Frank Caprio, Corporate Trainer – Major Market Specialist at Hose Master.

For more information about metal hose products or to see which metal hose may be a good fit for your application, please contact Gallagher Fluid Seals today.

Metal Detectable & X-Ray Detectable Rubber Materials

Food, Beverage, and Pharmaceutical Regulations

picture of metal detectable o-ringStringent government regulations mandate that food, beverage, and pharmaceutical manufacturers keep foreign material out of ingredients to ensure food and drug safety for consumers. Preventing foreign material from entering the processing stream is of the utmost concern but there must also be measures in place to detect contaminated product and quarantine it before distribution.

Component parts that are used in food and drug processing equipment can become damaged by improper installation and/or excessive shear experienced during operation that causes fragments of rubber, plastic, and metal to contaminate ingredients. Chemicals used for cleaning and sterilization of equipment can cause rubber seals to degrade, increasing the probability of particles breaking off and entering the consumable products. Part failures causing product contamination can lead to machine down time, scrap product, product recalls and result in legal problems and negative media attention. All of which have a significant financial impact and can compromise brand loyalty within the market.

Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP)

picture of precision metal detectable o-ringsMany processing operations now employ HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) programs which stipulate that all parts have to be metal detectable and X-ray detectable. This made it necessary to develop special rubber materials that would allow food processors to conduct routine inspections for this type of contamination utilizing in-line metal detectors and X-ray machines. Rubber must be compounded with special additives to make detection possible. However, certain foods have phase angles similar to metal detectable rubber so a complete understanding of the rubber product’s application is necessary for proper compound selection.

Metal Detectable O-Rings | X-Ray Detectable O-Rings

Precision Associates has developed four Metal and X-Ray detectable materials made with ingredients sanctioned under FDA Title 21 CFR 177.2600.

All four materials are 3A Sanitary 18-03 approved and are available in Silicone, Nitrile, EPDM, and FKM. Each is 70 durometer and blue in color. (The industry standard color is blue but materials can be colored for specific customer requirements and any polymer can be made metal detectable).

All compounds were tested by an independent laboratory and found to have magnetic properties that exceed industry standards.

picture of compound table precision o-rings


The original article was written by Precision Associates, Inc. and can be found here.

For more information about what Gallagher can offer through Precision Associates, or to talk to a technical sales expert about these materials, contact us today.

Accurate Long-Term Predictions for Seals

The static seals used in large energy and industrial facilities can be challenging to install and difficult to replace. They must, therefore, function flawlessly for periods longer than 20 years. Up until now, the existing tools used to calculate the long-term performance of sealing materials for these kinds of applications have often led to the components being larger than actually necessary.

Freudenberg Sealing Technologies has now developed a method that takes into account the material changes at the molecular level when predicting the long-term durability of seals. The new methodology is more reliable than previous models and ensure fewer materials to be used.

picture of wind turbinesThe seals used in plant engineering must have a very long service life. Once they are installed – to protect offshore wind turbine towers from salt corrosion, for example – customers typically require that they perfectly fit for more than 20 years. The service life of a seal is limited based on two things: First, by setting or stretching (physical relaxation). And second, chemical changes cause the material loses its elasticity over time.

Under the influence of atmospheric oxygen or ozone, two basic effects that influence the aging of seals can be observed: First, the polymer chains and networks can fracture under mechanical stress, and second, additional oxygen bridges can develop in the network as a result of oxidation processes. Both effects influence important properties of relevance for seals such as stiffness, contact pressures or the ability to regain their original shape after deformation, also referred to as resistance to deformation.

Extrapolation with the Arrhenius Equation

To determine whether a material actually meets the requirements for a specific application, engineers usually conduct so-called “storage tests” in which the test specimen is exposed to temperatures well over 100° C for a longer period of time – usually 1,000 hours – to predict temperature-dependent aging. Engineers typically extrapolate the measured values using the Arrhenius Equation, a method named after the Swedish chemist and Nobel Prize winner Svante August Arrhenius. Continue reading Accurate Long-Term Predictions for Seals

How to Solve Large-Size Sealing Challenges at Temperatures up to 800°C (1472°F)

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.

Original content can be found on Parker’s Website and was written by Thorsten Kleinert, Business Unit Manager, Composite Sealing Systems Engineered Materials Group, Europe.


When classic sealing materials reach their limits, such as temperature ranges above 300°C and below -50°C – alternative materials are sometimes required, such as metal seals with appropriate coating/plating.

picture of metal sealParker offers metal seals made of stainless steel or nickel alloys in C-rings, E-rings, and other o-ring designs characterized by high pre-loading force and significant resilience. Drawing on many years of experience in the gas turbine market, Parker has continually expanded its expertise in large diameters and developed special problem solutions that substantially increase the efficiency of the machines.

Metal Seal Types and Sizes

The most important manufacturing technologies used to produce metal seals from stainless steel or nickel alloys are rolling, forming, CNC machining, welding, heat treatment, and coating/plating. In its more than 60-year history of producing metal seals, Parker has continually tackled the challenge of manufacturing increasingly large metal seals. Currently, spring-energized C-rings with a diameter of up to 7.6 m can be produced for which special forming machines and patented welding techniques were developed. They are supported by optimized special heat treatment and electroplating processes that make it possible to manufacture high-quality products even in such large dimensions. Additionally, Parker offers non-rotationally symmetric metal seals. These E-, O- and C-seals can be produced in lengths of up to 2.3 m on machines specifically developed for this purpose.

Products

  • C-seals: ≤ 3,000 mm (118 inches)
  • Spring-energized C-seals: ≤ 7,600 mm (299 inches)
  • O-rings: ≤ 1,200 mm (47 inches)
  • E-seals:
    • Heat-treated ≤ 2,700 mm (106 inches)
    • Segmented ≤ 7,600 mm (299 inches)

Materials and Coatings

picture of gas turbineThe base materials used are special nickel alloys that withstand temperatures of more than 800 °C. These cobalt-nickel-chromium-tungsten alloys or heat-treatable nickel super-alloys make high demands on the welding technology used and are reliably processed at Parker due to optimized manufacturing processes and comprehensive suitability tests.

The choice of plating is primarily focused on wear protection, corrosion resistance and improvement of the sealing properties. For this purpose, the surface properties of the metal seal are modified and a formable external surface layer with adjusted hardness is created.


For more information about  sealing large-size applications with high temperatures, contact Gallagher’s engineering department.

Gallagher is an authorized distributor for Parker products.

Case Study: Style 204 Expansion Joint w/ GUARDIAN® FEP Liner – Paper Mill

Garlock Style 204 Rubber Expansion Joint

picture of style 204The Style 204 family of spool-type expansion joints are manufactured with the industry standard narrow arch design. This style is intended to be used in dynamic conditions where both pressure and vacuum concerns are present.

Features and Benefits

  • Fully laboratory and field tested for long life and exceptional reliability
  • High pressure and vacuum resistance offer increased safety and ensure suitability for a wide range of applications
  • Single and multi-arch designs are available for a range of movement capabilities
  • Concentric and eccentric reducing configurations can be provided to join piping of unequal diameters
  • Available in a variety of elastomers and fabric combinations to meet the varied demands of temperature, pressure, and media

picture of paper mill

INDUSTRY

Pulp and Paper

CUSTOMER

Large South Eastern Paper Mill

BACKGROUND

A U.S. paper mill experienced multiple failures of expansion joints on the knotter screen pumps in the fiber area of the plant. The failures caused significant downtime and posed a safety hazard to employees working in the area.

OPERATING CONDITIONS

  • Size- 24”ID (DN600)
  • Temperature- Less than 250°F (120°C)
  • Application- Knotter screen feed pump
  • Media- Black liquor with wood fiber
  • Pressure- Less than 65 psi (4.5bar)

CHALLENGES FACED

A field survey determined that the expansion joints were experiencing significant elongation during installation. It was also evident that the pump and pipe flanges were not in parallel, creating angular misalignment. Additionally, the expansion joints were handling an aggressive media of black liquor and wood fibers, which collectively contributed to the failure.

SOLUTION AND BENEFITS

Through on-site troubleshooting and surveying of the expansion joints, engineers were able to recommend and design an adapter plate for the pump flanges to realign the pump to the piping. This allowed the plant to standardize the replacement expansion joints to Style 204 with GUARDIAN® FEP liner to be used in multiple locations. In addition, the mechanical bond of the GUARDIAN® FEP liner provided greater reliability than the adhesive bond of competitive PTFE lined expansion joints. Replacement cost and frequency has been significantly reduced as a result of this engineered solution.


The original case study can be found on Garlock’s website here.

Gallagher Fluid Seals is an authorized distributor of Garlock. For questions about products or to learn more about rubber expansion joints, contact our engineering department.