Tag Archives: eclipse engineering

The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Channel Seal

The Channel Seal (or Cap Seal, as it’s often referred to), was one of the earliest forms of Polymer or Teflon sealing in the seal industry.

The product is easily applied. It didn’t replace the O-ring, but instead offered improved life while reducing drag.

In doing so, hydraulic and pneumatic systems operated cooler and quieter, while improving overall performance of the product.

picture of channel seal

Evolution of the Channel Seal

Before the Channel Seal, the Backup ring was established. The first Backup rings started out as leather, as this material was readily available and could be easily formed into any shape with simple dies to stamp the Backup ring out.

Back up rings provided support for the O-ring, allowing the O-ring to operate at higher pressures, while closing off the Extrusion or “E” gap. This stopped the O-ring from being nibbled in the extrusion gap, therefore extending the life of the O-ring.

Teflon Backup rings were a big improvement, as they would better fill the gap and would stay put (as opposed to leather, which tended to shift in the groove). With the use of two Backup rings, an O-ring was well supported from pressure in both directions.

It was a simple matter to connect the two Backup rings with a thin membrane of Teflon, which removed the O-ring from the sealing surface. This change reduced drag and improved performance, while still maintaining an excellent mechanism for extrusion resistance.

This design was relatively simple to machine out of Teflon, but installation was a challenge, as the Backup rings were full depth. This caused the seal to become distorted during the install process. Today, we almost never see this type of design.

With CNC machining, the ability to nestle, and an O-ring design in a complex Teflon shape, it gave rise to what is referred to today as the Channel Seal, or Cap Seal.

This style seal offers an abundance of advantages over standard back-up rings and the early version of the Channel Seal, which was simply a Backup ring with the membrane of Teflon in-between. Continue reading The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Channel Seal

Evolving from Plastic to Teflon Seals

The term “plastics” is generic way of describing a synthetic material made from a wide range of organic polymers. Organic polymers describes a man-made substance that is formulated using polymer chains to create what we commonly refer to as…(you guessed it), plastics.

Before plastic, leather had been used to create Backup ring devices behind O-rings. Leather allows fluids to be retained, providing lubrication for the O-ring when the system was running dry.

picture of teflonThe problem with leather was that it could become dry and shrink away from the sealing service, exposing the elastomer to same pressure it was intended to protect against.

With the advent of polymers, a piece of plastic could be cut or formed into the exact shape to allow for zero extrusion gap, and for continued protection for the O-ring.

Some polymers were very brittle. Since they needed to be deformed to allow for installation into solid glands, the cut of the plastic could nibble at the O-ring, causing premature failure of the element it was supposed to be protecting.

The Revolution of PTFE

When PTFE moved out of the lab and into industrial use, it quickly found itself adjacent to the O-ring. PTFE offers extrusion resistance and, at the same time, doesn’t erode or nibble at the O-ring due to the “softness” of the polymer.(Hardness between 55 and 65 Shore D)

Given the composition of PTFE, or Teflon, it could be utilized as a sealing element to protect Backup rings and conform to the shaft. The bonus was it was generally easy on shafts (depending on the filler added to the PTFE).

There are some negative aspects to Teflon that needed to be overcome by early engineers. First, it has a fairly high rate of Thermal expansion which, by its own nature, could often times lose contact with the sealing surface. This meant some kind of loading was necessary to ensure contact.

PTFE is as tough as other polymers, so the fact that it could seal on a shaft made it vulnerable during installation for tears or nicks on sealing surface.

Second, if it were stretched during installation, the material had to be sized back to its original shape due to its poor elastic properties. Continue reading Evolving from Plastic to Teflon Seals

The Manufacturing Challenges of Tiny Spring Energized Seals

tiny spring energized sealEclipse Engineering has in-house capabilities to manufacture seals up to 55 inches in diameter, and over 100 inches through production partners.

While seals with huge diameters certainly grant their own significant levels of intricacy, here we’ll look at the other end of the spectrum: the micro-sized seals.

We won’t just look at a simple seal ring, but an inherently more complicated and geometrically detailed spring energized seal. As we’ll see, very small diameters make multiple manufacturing aspects more involved and challenging.

The Client’s Issue

A sealing solution in a customer’s epoxy dispensing equipment. They needed an effective seal for the reciprocating rod responsible for the flow-control and metering of the epoxy while being dispensed.

Operating Conditions:

  • Reciprocating Rod Seal
  • Epoxy Dispensing Head
  • Rod Diameter: 1.2mm [0.047”]
  • Stroke Length: 6mm [0.236”]
  • Cycle Rate: 15 per min
  • Media: Epoxy
  • Operating Pressure: 1,500 PSI
  • Temperature: 70° to 150°F

In general terms, most viscous media sealing solutions have three things in common:

  1. A variant of UHMW for the seal jacket,
  2. heavy spring loading, and
  3. multiple point contacts with increased interference.

In most cases, multiple nested V-Springs are incorporated to provide optimal load and energize the compound contact points on the seal. With this formula, we’ve had great success sealing media like epoxy, urethane, silicones and acrylics.

The heavy loading is necessary to effectively wipe the reciprocating rod. This is balanced with the correct material and design geometry to provide long wear life of the seal, which has the potential to be compromised under such loading.

The challenge in this case was to incorporate these same proven principles in a micro-sized seal.

The Eclipse Solution

Continue reading The Manufacturing Challenges of Tiny Spring Energized Seals

Spring Types and Materials in Sealing Systems

Springs are an integral part of all sealing systems. A simple air cylinder has O-rings to seal in the air, and the O-ring exhibits spring-like qualities to ensure a good seal over a broad temperature range.

But what are the different types of springs and materials in sealing systems? And how do you choose the best for your application?

image of metal spring types

Metal Springs

Metal springs, such as the Cantilever and Canted Coil spring, are used to energize polymers such as Teflon and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW) to allow sealing in a wide range of temperatures. Selecting the correct spring material is critical to the life of the seal.

Metal energized seals are often subjected to a wide variety of fluids and temperature ranges, which then requires the correct material choice for the life of the seal in the application.

One of the earliest metal springs was the flat band or marcel expander, often made from common materials like 300 series Stainless Steel or heat treated 17-7 Stainless Steel.

These materials are often chosen for their tensile strength. But due to the cost to manufacture and the high volumes of spring required, these two expanders were often relegated to industrial or aerospace hydraulic systems.

If system fluids were not compatible with Stainless Steel, customers generally went to a different sealing system to avoid the high cost of short runs in these styles of energizers.

O-Rings cover a wide range of temperatures, and fluids, but generally not both. If there are multiple fluids involved, O-Rings often fail to provide compatibility over a range of fluids.

The use of Cantilever, Canted Coil or Helical coiled spring allowed for long runs and lower costs. The most common spring material is Stainless Steel, but these styles of spring lend themselves to materials that have a wide range of chemical and temperature range while maintaining tensile strength.

Alternative Spring Materials

Some of the more common alternative materials are Hastelloy and Elgiloy. While 17-7 is available, it’s seldom used because Elgiloy (while more expensive per pound) is often run at a higher volume, bringing the overall cost down making 17-7 less attractive due to cost.

Another style metal spring for polymers is the Garter spring. Garter springs are normally run on a per job basis, but because it’s made from wire, it can easily be wound from any material like Elgiloy or Stainless.

Garter springs are often used in rubber style lip seals, but we often find them coupled with polymer-style seals.

Mechanical Seals

Mechanical face seals typically marry a material with the fluids the seal will be running in. Mechanical seals have the overall body and internal springs made from specific materials capable of handling variations in temperature and fluids.

PEEK in Seals

Polymers are thought of as seal materials, but PEEK has been used as a spring in polymer-style seals. PEEK can be wound into helical style springs, and also formed into cantilever springs. As a Helical style, it can be wound into a diameter to energize Teflon or rubber lip seals.

If you consider radiation service, a PEEK spring makes an excellent choice keeping metals out of the seal.

How to Choose the Right Spring Material

While there are a variety of metals, often economics determine the practicality of specialty metals.

A consideration is reviewing the hardware used in the application as to what spring material is acceptable in an application. We often review what the customer is using in the rest of the service for determining a spring material.

Temperature is often a key factor in determining materials for spring. Elgiloy tends to do an excellent job in maintaining tensile strength at elevated temperatures.


The original article can be found on Eclipse Engineering’s website and was written by Cliff Goldstein.

Gallagher Fluid Seals is an authorized distributor of Eclipse engineering. For more information about choosing the right spring material for your application, contact our engineering department today.

The Many Uses of Polytetrafluoroethylene Seals (Teflon)

Better known as Teflon in the industry, Polytetrafluoroethylene is widely used in practically every industry on and off the planet (and even beneath its surface!)

Medical Uses

white ptfe o-ring-teflonThis material’s primary claim to fame is its resistance to most chemicals. It inherently has an extremely low coefficient of friction, it’s easily machined from rods, tubes, or compression-molded shapes.

It’s one of the few polymers that are approved for medical implants due to its inertness to bodily fluids — the immune system principally ignores its presence in the body.

Moving away from the body, you’ll find PTFE or Teflon products in medical devices such as heart lung machines, rotary tools for cutting, and sealing devices for maintaining fluid streams for irrigation and pumping. Tiny fragments that may come loose during usage are not harmful to the body, and simply pass through the system.

Pharmaceutical Uses

In the pharmaceutical industry, Teflon is used in the processing of drugs for equipment used to manufacture such as mixers, presses, and bushings. Teflon is found in a variety of applications, as any debris from the seal will pass through the body without consequence.

When considering press machinery (which are often water driven to ensure any leakage will not spoil the product), Teflon seals are often used to help reduce friction — especially in repetitive presses where a build-up of heat would be detrimental to the seal and the product.

Food & Beverage Uses

Mixers are another area to ensure keeping grease and other contaminants from the motor to not descend into the product from the mixer shaft.

Another area is pressure vessels where two shells are clamped together to ensure product remains sealed inside. Failure of these seals usually results in loss of product.

Non-metal bearings that don’t requiring grease in rotary motion are an excellent place for Teflon style bushings. These bushings provide long life with very low friction while not contaminating the product. Shaft wear from the bushing may be eliminated with the use of Teflon.

Types of PTFE (Teflon) Seals

Seals in the medical field can be as simple as a static O-Ring, or a mechanical face seal which is costly and requires special consideration during installation. Most dynamic applications can be resolved with spring-energized style seals, which often have very low friction and can be clean in place (CIP) if required.

There are different styles of springs, such as cantilever or canted coil that provide varying loads. The cantilever-style spring-energized seal provides a linear load based on deflection providing a high level of seal-ability. It can be silicone-filled to provide CIP for ease of washing, and there are a variety of materials that are FDA compliant and that work well in both viscous and pure aqueous fluids.

Canted coil spring-energized seals provide a unique feature of controlling the load the spring exhibits on the sealing element. This allows for control of a device being manipulated during a procedure.

The polymer properties give the user materials with the lowest possible friction, while still sealing in an application. The load from a canted coil spring allows the user to feel a tool in a catheter while passing the catheter through a tube, and still retaining a seal.

As you can see, PTFE has a variety of uses across a broad range of industries. GFS’ partner, Eclipse Engineering, manufactures PTFE and can help provide solutions to customers facing both simple fixes or complex problems.

Contact us today to see if PTFE might be the right choice for your application.


For custom engineered parts, or for more information about a variety of PTFE seals we can provide, contact Gallagher Fluid Seals today.

The original article was written by Eclipse Engineering and can be found on their website.

Angled Spring Grooves for Custom Spring Energized Ball Seats

A ball valve is a simple and robust valve used in applications and industries across the spectrum. It consists of a ball with a hole through the center that can be rotated 90°.

custom spring energized ball seat

The hole is either aligned with flow and open, or perpendicular to flow and closed. The straightforward, quarter-turn action is fast and simple to operate, and the position of the handle provides a clear indicator of whether the valve is open or closed.

Most ball valves are typically used as a shut-off valve. Many households likely use ball valves at some point in the water supply plumbing.

Not relegated to common plumbing, many industries use ball valves for critical control applications including aerospace and cryogenics. Their reliable operation and high-pressure handling ability make them an attractive solution for many specialty operations.

Seals Inside a Ball Valve

The seals inside the ball valve play an important role in their performance and reliability. There are two main seals in a common ball valve, which are referred to as seats.

The seats are typically machined or molded to match the diameter of the ball and are mechanically compressed against the ball face. Seat material varies by application needs, but virgin PTFE is frequently used for this application.

The Client’s Issue

The customer wanted a very specialized ball seat: utilizing a spring energizer in the seat. While easy to suggest, this would create a significant challenge in how the seal is manufactured.

The customer was looking for a sealing solution for a ball valve in their industrial gas processing plant. The ball valve would serve as a critical shut-off point in the system. The valve would be actuated by an electric motor, and could therefore be operated remotely.

The customer was looking for an improvement in the overall wear life of the ball seats, while still providing consistent and predictable actuation torque. Being motor activated, the torque required to move the ball open or closed was limited—so the friction generated by the ball seats would need to be carefully controlled.

Operating Conditions:

  • Ball Valve Seat
  • Ball Diameter: Ø2.500”
  • Media: Petroleum Processing Gases
  • Pressure: 100 PSI
  • Temperature: -40° to 175°F

The Challenge

Continue reading Angled Spring Grooves for Custom Spring Energized Ball Seats

How AMS3678 Ensures Consistency in Sealing Materials

When it comes to designing and developing seals, the aerospace and industrial industries need a basis to allow production anywhere in the world.

One of the first PTFE (Teflon) standards, AMS3678, describes Teflon and the addition of fillers. This was used in conjunction with Mil-R-8791, which is one of the Mil specs describing a backup ring device.

The origin of all these specs dates back to the creation of the O-ring.

AMS3678The Origin of the O-Ring Patent

In 1939, Niels A. Christensen was granted a U.S. Patent for “new and useful improvements in packings and the like for power cylinders.” These referred to improved packing rings made of “solid rubber or rubber composition very dense and yet possessive of great liveliness and compressibility.” These products were suitable for use as packings for fluid medium pistons (liquid or air). The improved packing ring is the modern O-ring.

There was a progression of standards for the O-rings created by individual countries, such as AS568, BS 1806, DIN 3771, JIS B2401, NF T47-501, and SMS 1586. Eventually, AS568 became more accepted in the industry.

The backup ring was originally created to help improve the O-ring’s ability to resist extrusion. Teflon was widely used as one of the materials for backup ring devices. Standards were created to unify the production of this Teflon device.

The Progression of Mil Specs

The progression of standard changes has led to AMS3678/1 for Virgin PTFE through AMS3678/16. These standards describe a group of Virgin- and filled-PTFE materials accepted by the industry for manufacturing seals and back-up ring devices.

Mil-R-8791 was canceled in February 1982. This spec was superseded with AS8791, which eventually evolved into AMS3678.

AMS3678 is a tool used by customers and Teflon suppliers to create uniformity in the manufacturing and processing of seal and bearing materials. The standard is inclusive of most of the compounds upon which the industry was built.

When customers approach with an old “mil spec”, they are pushed to the new AMS spec which is currently active. Eclipse manufactures to the spec so their customers will have the confidence that they manufacture to a known standard.

When crossing custom materials from well-known sources, customers are driven to an accepted spec that is equivalent to the original source of the material. This helps customers sell their products with internationally-known materials rather than custom, home-grown compounds that are often intended to single source those materials.

There are several qualifications of the spec that suppliers must observe. This includes dimensional stability tests. This test ensures the material has been properly annealed, and that the seal or backup ring will fit and function as it was originally intended.

Eclipse is uniquely qualified to supply parts to the latest AMS3678 specification. They understand the scope of the specification which allows us to ship parts with fully traceable certification.

AMS3678 helps validate a material to a customer to ensure they get the same material processed the same way with each order. Beyond this, there are other ways to determine what makes a part process-capable.

Continue reading How AMS3678 Ensures Consistency in Sealing Materials

Case Study: Balancing Extrusion Gap and Wear Ring Exposure in a High-Pressure C02 Extraction Application

Seal designers often feel caught in the constant struggle to balance the demands of a sealing application with physical and material constraints.

picture of piston

At Eclipse, it’s an engineer’s job to understand and weigh these limitations with the goals of the application. For example, when a customer needs an extremely low friction seal that also has very high sealability, there’s always a compromise that needs to happen.

A magical seal material that has the pliability and excellent seal characteristics of rubber, and the low-friction, high-wear resistance and temperature range of PTFE simply doesn’t exist.

Another frequent scenario is a customer needing a seal to accommodate loose or poor hardware tolerances, yet has a very small physical envelope to incorporate a seal. The smaller the seal, the smaller the effective deflection range due to the physical limits or an O-Ring or spring.

While the application might need to cover the range of a 400-series spring or O-Ring, there may only be room for a seal the size of a zero series, which presents a problem. Similarly, a customer might have the desire for a seal with very long wear life, yet the hardware assembly may be severely limited in the area meant for the seal.

There have been several times where Eclipse has been approached with applications where a space for a seal was never considered in the original design. Without a properly sized seal, wear life has the potential to be restricted due to the fact there is less seal material available to be worn away before the structural integrity and sealability is compromised.

Another common problem in sealing applications where bearings are needed is the balance between having enough exposure for the wear rings and not creating too large of an extrusion gap, which can lead to complications for the seal. Eclipse was approached by a customer facing this issue in their high-pressure, supercritical CO2 extraction equipment.

The Client’s Issue

With the growing popularity of cannabis-derived products such as CBD oil, extraction processes are being examined for increased productivity and durability.

A customer was looking to redesign the piston seals used in their CO2 SFE extraction equipment. The ideal seal would have improved wear life and longevity as well as improved lead-time and availability of the seals once they needed to be replaced.

The customer’s increased production volumes and run-rates where quickly wearing out the OEM seals, and they were unhappy with the lead-time and service of the original seal supplier.

With some of the best lead-times in the industry for custom PTFE seals, Eclipse knew it could deliver if an improved seal design could be implemented.

Operating Conditions:

  • Reciprocating Piston Seal
  • Bore Diameter: Ø3.250”
  • Stroke: 6”
  • Cycle Rate: 35 cycles per minute
  • Media: CO2
  • Pressure: 800–5,000 PSI
  • Temperature: 65° to 175°F

The customer was willing to redesign the piston seal gland configuration, but the overall length of the piston couldn’t be changed to ensure correct functionality in the original equipment.

Since there was significant side-loading of the piston, wear rings would be necessary for both proper piston guidance and to safeguard against any potential metal-to-metal contact between the piston and bore.

If metal-to-metal contact occurred and the bore was scratched or galled, the customer would face extensive down-time while they waited for a replacement part. This would cost them a significant amount of money from lost productivity, not to mention the cost of the replacement bore.

To mitigate this potential risk, the customer didn’t want to eliminate wear rings or reduce their width. Eclipse needed to find a solution that worked with this specific design constraint, and with the amount of axial space available on the piston for the seal.

This space constraint presented a challenge. With the importance of proper wear ring exposure in the system, the extrusion gap needed to be sizable. And with limited space to either substantially extend the heel of the seal or incorporate a back-up ring, Eclipse needed to utilize special design techniques and features to present a high wear life seal.

The Eclipse Solution

Balancing extrusion gap and wear ring exposure is a very typical problem in the seal industry. In systems where operating pressures are relatively low, this might not be a problem. But when pressures increase, seal integrity can quickly become compromised.

In a piston application, wear-ring exposure and seal extrusion gap become the same entity. In most cases, once tolerance stack-ups are performed with both the bearing and hardware dimensions, the resulting necessary exposure dimension will be far beyond the typical maximum extrusion gap recommendation for the seal.

If not given enough exposure on the piston, the wear ring has the potential to be loose in the groove, making it ineffective as a bearing. This would place undue side loading on the seal, leading to premature failure and/or the piston contacting the bore.

In almost every case, this metal-to-metal contact will likely gall or score the bore enough to destroy a proper sealing surface finish, if not more extensive damage.

On the other hand, if the extrusion gap that results from the need for bearing exposure is too large, the seal will eventually be pushed into the gap by the pressure and ultimately cause a failure. The higher the pressure of a system, the smaller a recommended extrusion gap will be.

Without any other considerations, extrusion gaps are typically suggested to be made as small as possible. This fact is obviously diametrically opposed to the need for bearing exposure.

To combat large extrusion gaps, spring energized seals can be made with an extended heel design. This physically puts more sealing material behind the seal, which can be deformed into the gap without affecting the critical area of the seal.

The other common solution is to incorporate a back-up ring behind the seal. A back-up ring can be designed to reduce the size of the extrusion gap that the seal is exposed to.

Both of these solutions require additional axial space on the piston, which Eclipse didn’t have the luxury of working with.

The first step: using a smaller spring series than the hardware cross-section would typically call for. The smaller spring would effectively allow the heel of the seal to be extended, aiding in the extrusion resistance of the seal. This also means the sealing lips would be thicker than normal.

Eclipse utilized this extra material in the lips to modify the seal geometry to further fortify against high pressure failure. The ultimate failure mode of a spring energized seal due to extrusion is usually when deformation of seal reaches the hinge point of the spring cavity. To guard against this, Eclipse offset the location of the spring groove to thicken this vulnerable hinge point.

Eclipse chose its ET040: Polyimide/MoS2 filled PTFE for the spring energized seal jacket. While this isn’t the most extrusion resistant material Eclipse has to offer, the customer’s stainless-steel bore material was limiting on how aggressive the seal material could be.

ET040 would provide a good level of toughness without wearing the bore. The added internal lubricity reduces friction, and the fine particle size of the Polyimide improves sealabilty while sealing gases such as CO2.

Eclipse chose its ET010: bronze-filled PTFE for the wear rings. This industry standard bearing material fit well within the design objectives of the project.

How the ET040 and ET010 Performed

With Eclipse’s revised seal and piston design, the customer saw increases in seal life and reliability. This allowed them to run their production processes for longer intervals between scheduled maintenance.

The reduced downtime increased plant productivity, positively affected the customer’s bottom-line, and allowed them stay on top of shipments of their high demand product.

The customer was also very pleased with Eclipse’s comparatively short lead-time and reliable delivery on replacement seals. Their moderate investment in redesigning their piston configuration to use Eclipse seals proved to be a profitable choice.

eclipse engineering seal and wear rings


Article written by Eclipse Engineering, Inc. For the original article, visit their website.

Gallagher Fluid Seals is a preferred distributor of Eclipse Engineering. Call us at 1-800-822-4063 for more information on Eclipse seals.

How Material and Spring Type Affect Friction Calculation

Dynamic Sealing Applications

This article will discuss how we understand and control friction in dynamic sealing applications.

It’s easy to stop a leak in a system by just welding it shut. But when you create a dynamic application, you generally have a limited amount of power to move the device you’re sealing.

Friction is a force that must be overcome in all moving pieces. Controlling friction allows us to make efficient equipment that can have a long wear life and move with a limited amount of force.

There are many factors that drive friction up or down in a dynamic application. Although this blog will focus on shaft seals, the same considerations apply to piston or face seals.

Below we’ll cover the following factors and how they affect the friction calculation in our seals:

  1. Shaft material, hardness, and finish.
  2. If the system will operate when lubricated or dry.
  3. The system pressure or vacuum.
  4. System operating temperature
  5. Seal material and the types of fillers.

canted flange with hardware

Seal Substrate

As a seal supplier, we usually like shaft materials to be hardened steel with surface finishes that are highly effective. Hardness above 50 Rc usually gives long wear life.

Having a good finish of 8 Ra. will insure long seal life and carry lubrication. However, depending on the application, there are times when a super finish of 2 or 3 Ra is justified.

Depending on shaft loading, there are many choices of surface finish that can reduce friction and improve the life of the seal. Understanding the bearing load under the seal helps to understand what finish is required to withstand the operating conditions.

There are some finishes that are detrimental to seal life. An example is a heavy chrome surface that looks sturdy, but usually can’t be ground smooth and is left with large peaks or valleys. Thin, dense chrome is often the opposite, giving good seal life if applied correctly. The engineers at Eclipse Engineering are prepared to make recommendations on hardness and finish. Continue reading How Material and Spring Type Affect Friction Calculation

The Advantages of Crimped Can Seals

A combination of crimped can seals will handle a variety of applications when a rubber lip seal is not your solution.

Rotary seals are often secured in sealing hardware by crimping the sealing element in a metal can. One of the most common rotary seals is a molded rubber lip seal in a can. 

While not crimped, the can retains the sealing element, and stops the seal from rotating in the gland. Rotary sealing elements for low pressure (under 15 psi), are often nitrile or Viton rubber sealing elements.

This style of seal comes in many cross sections, and may include garter springs to help the seal stay engaged with the shaft. These seals are typically low in cost, and produced in high volume.

These seals are found in many low-pressure applications. However, as the pressures begin to climb over 10 psi and speeds run over 500 ft/min, friction generates heat, which accelerates wear on the rubber element and in turn begins to wear the mating shaft material.crimped can seal

Overcoming Friction

Friction or the resultant heat is the largest concern in rotary service.

The crimped can seal with PTFE (Teflon) elements can run with pressures in excess of 500 Psi and PV (pressure- velocity) reaching over 350,000psi-ft/ min. The crimped can allows these elements to remain secure.

The crimped case seal causes all the relative motion to remain at the sealing lip interface. With the crimped can, we have the opportunity to install multiple lips or seal cross sections to handle a variety of loads. This allows us to control leakage, and keep friction to a minimum.

We can seal most any fluid or run dry sealing gases with little or no lubrication. With widely varying temperatures, we can include springs to maintain seal contact, offset some eccentricity of shafts, keep dirt out or keep very light loads.

Continue reading The Advantages of Crimped Can Seals