Tag Archives: Parker Hannafin

Semiconductor Fab Processes Benefit From Retention Ribbed EZ-Lok Seals

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.

Original content can be found on Parker’s Website and was written by Nathaniel Reis, applications engineer, Parker O-Ring & Engineered Seals Division.


When it comes to semiconductor fabrication processes, reducing the cost of ownership is a multi-faceted goal approached from a variety of angles. Tool engineers and equipment technicians take pride in their ability to identify factors that limit tool uptime. One constant headache they face is the mechanical failure of seals in dynamic environments. This can lead to premature downtime or reduced preventative maintenance (PM) intervals, both of which lead to a higher cost of ownership. Fortunately, tool owners have begun to implement seal designs better suited for these dynamic environments: Parker EZ-Lok is a proven solution.

Spiral Failure

picture of spiral o-ring failure

One of the more extreme forms of mechanical failure to be prevented is twisting and spiraling of an O-ring during operation. This occurs with O-rings in dovetail glands where one of the sealing surfaces is a door that opens and closes against the seal. The combination of stiction to the door and stretch in the gland causes the O-ring to roll and twist repeatedly with each cycle, resulting in permanent cyclic deformation. This means that a seal profile with a flat contact surface is vital for this type of dynamic function.

Other designs

The basic D-profile is the fundamental simple shape that serves as the basis of the EZ-Lok solution. The flat portion of the “D” holds the seal in place and prevents rolling, while the opposite, round contact surface focuses the sealing force and helps keep volume requirements at a minimum. These geometric features make for sound sealing function while preventing the drastic spiral damage seen so often in the industry.

picture of d-profile

A standard D-ring is still more limited by volume requirements than traditional seals like O-rings. In addition, a D-ring’s sharp corners can become difficult to install past the top groove radii if the seal is made much wider than the groove opening. On the other hand, a seal made any narrower would be easily removed without intention, such as that induced by stiction to the door. These reasons are why the basic D-profile alone is not the answer to these failure modes.

The Solution

picture of Parker EZ-Lok seal

The solution to these dilemmas is a unique D-shaped profile with a geometry that lends itself to the spacial constrictions of dovetail glands, prevents rolling, and locks into place: the Parker EZ-Lok seal. These seals are designed with special retention ribs placed with precise frequency around the seal circumference that allows for smooth installation and keeps the seal retained in the gland. This design also removes any tendency to stretch the seal during installation, which is often seen with more conventional seals.

The combination of retention ribs with a fundamental D-ring profile makes EZ-Lok the ideal geometry for effective use of the high-performance compounds typically required for aggressive semiconductor chemistries. EZ-Lok seals allow for lower cost of ownership through PM-minimization and reduced seal overhead costs, made possible by effective mechanical design. This is an example of how Parker’s effective design engineering can reduce the cost of ownership and bring premier solutions to the table.


For more information about Parker’s full suite of solutions and sealing products, contact Gallagher Fluid Seals’ engineering department.

Engineered Materials and Sealing Solutions for Flow Batteries

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.
Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


Sealing can often be a frustrating challenge when dealing  with flow batteries. Determining what materials are compatible with certain chemistries or developing a profile that provides optimal sealing under available compression can be a time-consuming task for those outside the sealing industry. A trial and error approach can have a significant overall cost impact through multiple prototype iterations, prolonged testing, and ultimately, delaying product commercialization.

Specialized support

Parker’s design and material engineers can provide support to your team in the critical, early stages of product development. With hundreds of engineered elastomeric materials to choose from, our team can identify and recommend a compound that works with your specific electrolytes or other fluids. With the exceptionally long lifetime requirements of flow batteries, our homogeneous rubber provides the elasticity needed to handle the many charge-discharge cycles the battery will see in its life.

Continue reading Engineered Materials and Sealing Solutions for Flow Batteries

The Difference Between Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Impedance

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.
Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


The Difference Between Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Impedance

Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) are useful for thermal management in electronic components, as they enhance heat transfer from a heat-generating component to a heat dissipater, or heat sink. One important aspect when selecting a TIM for your application is knowing the material’s ability to transfer heat, which is often given by way of thermal conductivityThermal_Montage and/or thermal impedance.

Across the industry, manufacturers often publish thermal conductivity in units of Watts / meter-Kelvin as well as thermal impedance in units of °C – inches2 / Watt on their datasheets. So, what is the difference between these two, and how should you consider them when selecting a TIM?

Thermal conductivity is a material property and describes the ability of the given material to conduct heat. Therefore, when a material’s thermal conductivity is high, the material is a better thermal conductor. This property is independent of material size, shape or orientation in a homogeneous material, and because of this, thermal conductivity is an idealized value.

To understand thermal impedance, we must first understand thermal resistance and thermal contact resistance.

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Compression Controlled Gaskets for Food and Pharmaceuticals

hygenic2At Gallagher Fluid Seals, we do our absolute best to understand the needs of our customers.  As a Top-25 Parker Distributor, we have a myriad of products at our fingertips to improve your processes.

One relatively new Parker product is their line of hygienic sanitary gaskets, coming out of the company’s integrated sealing systems (ISS) Division in Lynchburg, VA.  These compression controlled gaskets are used widely in the food processing and pharmaceutical industries, being USP Class VI, FDA, and NSF approved.

Here’s what Parker has to say about these products:

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Reduce Standard Groove Size with Parker Diamond Seals+

Parker Diamond SealsParker Diamond Seals are designed to be a compact, robust axial seal alternative to standard cross section seals. Their unique design allows for reduced compression forces, making them ideal for small, lightweight housings in aerospace and military applications.

Narrow cross section
With a tall and narrow diamond-like cross section, the diamond seal groove is 60% narrower than traditional grooves for comparable seal heights. The narrow cross section of the seal allows it to be used in tight corners and around small holes. The groove width savings allows housing to become thinner, reducing the weight assemblies and is less expensive to machine when compared to standard grooves.

Continue reading Reduce Standard Groove Size with Parker Diamond Seals+