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Measuring Metal Hose Assembly Lengths

“Which way do I measure this metal hose?”

A common question among some customers who use metal hoses is: “Which way do I measure this metal hose?” Well, there’s a few different options.

  1. The first method is to measure the overall length of the assembly.
  2. Or, the live flexible length of the hose assembly can be measured.

Live Length vs Overall Length

Traditionally, the live length – or the amount picture showing live length versus overall lengthof flexible hose between the fitting – is used to determine whether there is sufficient hose length to accommodate a certain offset or movement, whereas the overall length of the assembly would be used to determine if the hose is going to fit in an application.

When measuring the overall length of the hose assembly, make sure to measure the overall length via end-of-fitting to end-of-fitting and if it has floating flanges on it, remember to measure to the face of the stub end on that floating flange.

JIC Swivel Fitting

If it’s a female JIC swivel fitting, however, it’s not necessary to measure the overall length to the end of the nut. Measure to the seat of the JIC inside the female swivel fitting. This is the standard for the metal hose industry.

Some customers may measure the overall diagram showing measurements with centerlinelength to the end of the JIC nut because some standards are measured differently by hydraulic manufacturers. If there are elbow fittings on the ends of the hose, metal hose industry standards dictate that measurements should be taken to the centerline of those elbow fittings rather than measuring the outside of the radius of the bend on those elbow fittings.

Laid flat with no kinks or bends

When measuring the length of a hose assembly, make sure it’s laid flat without any kinks or bends in the assembly. If it’s a strip wound hose assembly, ensure that strip wound hose is in its relaxed length, midway point between fully compressed and fully extended. Then, take the measurements on the length of that assembly.

For a great visual representation of measuring metal hose assembly lengths, watch this informative video below from Hose Master:


This video was produced by Hose Master and can be found on their Youtube channel or on their website.

For more information, contact Gallagher Fluid Seals or call 1-800-822-4063.

Metal Hose Application Do’s and Don’ts – Part 2

Metal hose applications can get tricky. Sometimes you can have problems or failures due to the surrounding piping system or because of the way the hose is installed.

Today we are going to discuss Part 2 of the do’s and don’ts when it comes to installing metal hose assemblies in a metal piping system.

Hoses can take a great deal of damage when they are torqued. Twisting it stretches the corrugations and the fitting wells and can cause it to fail. To prevent torque, don’t install the hose off-center.

When it tries to flex, the assembly will be torqued. Do install the hose in-line with itself; called in-plain. This prevents it from torquing when it flexes, and you should stick to one plain of movement. A quick test for in-plain could be done with either a sheet of paper or a flat surface like a table.

When handling long lengths or coils of hose, it’s important to make diagram of a hose wrapsure the hose doesn’t get twisted. Don’t grab one end of the coiled hose and walk away or pull on one end with the other end fixed. This will torque the hose. Do coil and uncoil it properly. Roll it like a tire or pretend like it would be on a reel and try not to twist it.

When installing a hose, significant physical damage can be done to the fitting, the welds, and the braid with the various tools that may be used to install it. Don’t use a wrench or other tools on the hose anywhere but on a hexpad. Gripping the hose by the braid, the braid collar, or the threads will damage the assembly. Do use a second wrench or a swivel-capable fitting when applicable to prevent twisting during the assembly installation.

Torquing the hose during installation is common and can be an issue. If the existing piping does not have any kind of swivel or rotation, don’t use an assembly with fixed-ends fittings at both ends. Otherwise, installation could torque the assembly and strain into service.

Do use a swivel, floating flange, or union, or other fitting that allows the hose assembly to twist during installation.

Follow these tips can help maximize your hose safety and the safety of your plant personnel. If you missed it, make sure to check out Part 1 of the video series.


This video was produced by Hose Master and can be found on their Youtube channel or on their website.