wear plates

  1. Vesconite Hilube Plate Proves Itself in Rotary Vacuum Filter

    A large food-processing company replaced several of the polyethylene plates on its rotary vacuum filters with plates made of the low-friction, high-compressive strength polymer known as Vesconite Hilube.


    Rotary vacuum filters are used for dewatering, washing and clarification, and rely on a vacuum to suck the water content out of a slurry mixture in which a vacuum drum rotates. After dewatering is completed, a dry cake remains on a cloth-covered drum, while the clarified liquid in the drum is transported out of the drum through a series of pipes.

    Vesconite Hilube wear plates have been successfully used at the interface between the vacuum drum and the exiting pipes at the client's facility.

    The processor’s mechanical department maintenance coordinator informs that the 800-millimetre-diameter (31.5 inches) 25-millimetre-thick (1 inch) Vesconite Hilube wear plates need to ensure that there is an adequate seal that prevents the liquid from leaking.

    They also need to have sufficient compressive strength to be secured by a trunnion plate, he says, noting that the equipment agent’s wear plates were of a much softer material and that this resulted in wear and eventual leaking.

    In addition, they need to have the correct pipe exiting alignment, with 16 holes in place for some of the rotary vacuum drum designs and 14 for other of the designs.

    Testing continues to verify the comparative wear life of the polyethylene wear plates and their replacement Vesconite Hilube wear plates.

    The processing company’s maintenance coordinator reports that the Vesconite Hilube plates have outlasted the polyethylene plates, but the exact wear life of both the polyethylene and Vesconite Hilube wear plates is unknown.

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  2. Vesconite Sliding Wear Plates Operate Beyond 1300 Hours

    Test-work on Vesconite polymer sliding wear plates have shown promising results on a crawler drill that is employed at a zinc project in the Northern Cape, South Africa.

    The wear plates were installed on the rotary head slide of a drill that carries out exploration drilling at the mine from which the goal is to exploit one of the largest zinc orebodies in the world.

    The rotary head moves the drill into the ground for deeper and shallower drilling. It also allows the drill to be changed.

    Since the rotary head moves approximately 120 times a day, wear on the slides has been considerable, and the original-equipment-manufacturer’s (OEM’s) nylon wear pads were only lasting 500 hours.

    As a result,

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