Category Archives: Parker Hannifin Seals

Learn more about Parker Hannifin seals, o-rings, polymer springs and much more in this collection of articles. Parker sealing products are used in a number of industries for a variety of applications, including hydraulic sealing systems.

How To Install an O-Ring in any Application

O-Rings continue to be the most widely utilized sealing product.  While the ‘Donut’ shaped profile has by and large been kept intact since their inception, continued elastomeric development has pushed o-ring temperature and chemical compatibility to limits unimaginable several decades ago.

Typically, O-Rings fail due to adverse effects of a number of factors, from improper installation and lubrication to incorrect size and design.  The collection of videos below will help you minimize installation errors that may lead to failure (be sure to bookmark this page for future reference).


How To Install an O-Ring – Standard Male Gland


How to Install an O-Ring – Standard Female Gland


How to Install an O-Ring – Face Seal Gland


How to Install an O-Ring – Dovetail Grooves


How to Install an O-Ring – Hollow O-Rings

Continuous Molding Enables Production of Large-Size Elastomer Seals

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.
Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


Continuous Molding - Vulcanization of Large Size O-RingsPrecision O-rings are manufactured by vulcanization in a closed mold using compression or injection molding. This makes it possible to produce O-rings in relatively small manufacturing tolerances and with good surface quality according to ISO 3601-1 and ISO 3601-3. Due to defined vulcanization parameters, precision O-rings exhibit consistently high mechanical properties across the entire circumference. This high quality level is an indispensable prerequisite for achieving consistently good sealing effects over a long period of time.

However, up to now, this production technology has been regarded in the sealing industry as not being economically feasible for O-rings in very large dimensions due to the enormous work and related costs involved in making extra-large molds. In addition, such large molds are extremely difficult to handle and therefore cannot be accomplished by many seal manufacturers.

Advantages of Continuous Vulcanization

The innovative manufacturing technology of continuous vulcanization used by Parker Prädifa, which does not involve failure-prone joints, enables the cost-efficient production of precision-quality O-rings with high mechanical load resistance in nearly any desired diameter. The technical properties of continuously vulcanized O-rings are comparable with those of O-rings produced by conventional compression molding. As a result of being molded, these XXL O-rings are quality products for challenging applications.

The surface qualities and tolerances correspond to those in ISO 3601:2012. However, this standard only covers cord thicknesses of up to 8.4 mm. To ensure that customers receive reliable and consistently high-quality O-rings where cord thickness is >8.4 mm, Parker Prädifa has developed an in-house standard based on ISO 3601:2012.

Customer-specific geometries for static and dynamic applications
In addition to precision-quality XXL O-rings, Parker Prädifa offers the development and production of customer-specific geometries in large diameters. A wide range of materials is available according to the application requirements.


Case study: Sealing solution for centrifuge (pharmaceutical industry)

Continuous Molding - Vulcanization of Large Size O-Rings

The challenge >> In the large-scale industrial production of semi-synthetic antibiotics, up to 500,000 liters of antibiotics are produced per batch. For such large-scale production to be economically feasible equipment of corresponding dimensions is required. In addition to large fermenters with diameters of several meters in which the biotech antibiotic is bred, centrifuges of similar dimensions are utilized to separate the antibiotic from process agents. Leakage must be prevented at all cost for safety and economic reasons. A leaking centrifuge might contaminate the antibiotics, resulting in high financial losses or, worse yet, in health and environmental hazards.

The solution >> Parker Prädifa was involved in the project at an early stage to develop a reliable sealing solution. The utilization of continuously vulcanized, i.e. jointless precision O-rings ensures the requisite reliability. Besides the seal design, the compound properties, particularly temperature and media resistance, play a key role. In addition to permanent temperatures of 250 °C, the seal has to withstand the aggressive media used in antibiotics production. The Parofluor® (FFKM) compound V8920 was selected as the suitable material for this application.


Case study: Lip seal ring for lithography system (semiconductor industry)

Continuous Molding - Vulcanization of Large Size O-Rings

The challenge >> The development of a new lithography system for semiconductor manufacturing posed the challenge of sealing two halves of a housing. Due to the tolerance situation in producing the respective housing halves, there was a risk of a gap of up to 0.5 mm occurring between the two halves in the assembled housing.

The solution >> In sealing technology, the gap dimensions to be bridged are typically between 0.05 mm and 0.25 mm. As larger gap dimensions available for sealing in the groove in this application could not be reliably sealed, or only by entailing a higher risk of leakage, with a solid seal such as an O-ring, a conventional O-ring sealing solution was not selected here, but a profile seal featuring a lip design. This seal was developed using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to ensure reliable sealing of large gaps and tolerance variations in the seal groove between the two halves of the housing. In addition, the shape of the seal prevents twisting during installation and reduces the required assembly forces.
In the selection of the seal compound, high purity requirements had to be considered. Due to specific post-curing processes, the FKM compound V0747 with low outgassing properties achieves outstanding results.

More information
EMG Report 07/2017, Page 22
Brochure: XXL Size Seals and Molded Parts


This article was contributed by Stefan Reichle, Market Unit Manager Indsutry, Engineered Materials Group Europe, Prädifa Technology Division.

Source: http://blog.parker.com/continuous-molding-enables-production-of-large-size-elastomer-seals-in-precision-quality

3 Guidelines to Ensure Proper O-Ring Installation

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.
Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


Incorrect O-ring installation can lead to assembly damage causing leakage during the first pressure test. If the system does not pressurize properly, the entire piece of equipment should be disassembled and seals must be replaced. Depending on when this test occurs, multiple manufacturing steps could be in between the seal installation and the first step where leakage can be identified. If O-ring damage happens with high frequency, you could be wasting time and money on seal replacement. Luckily, there are some easy steps that can be followed to help prevent this from occurring. Parker’s recommended guidelines for installation include always using lubrication, good gland design, and ensuring correct sizing.

Lubrication Makes Installation Easier

O-Ring Installation - Parker O-LubeUsing lubrication is an essential facet of proper installation. Lubrication reduces surface friction between the O-ring and mating surfaces, allowing the O-ring to seat in the groove with very little difficulty. In male and female radial seals, lubrication will reduce installation force and create a smooth transition as the piston is inserted in the bore.

Choosing the proper lubricant requires careful consideration of your system. You must ensure the lubricant choice is compatible with the material being used, suitable for the temperature range of the application, compatible with the system fluids, capable of producing a high surface tension film, and does not clog system filters.

Continue reading 3 Guidelines to Ensure Proper O-Ring Installation

VIDEO: How to Lubricate an O-Ring

Lubrication of O-rings is extremely important. The greatest benefit of using a lubricant is typically obtained during installation.

Parker O-Lube - Lubricant for O-RingsUsing a lubricant is going to decrease the surface friction of the O-ring helping to prevent abrasion, pinching or cutting of the O-ring during installation.  Lubricating an O-ring can also help to seat the O-ring properly into the application, as well as aid and speed up automated assembly processes.

The proper method of applying a lubricant to an O-ring always seems to be an area of concern for many of our customers and there are many methods used in the marketplace. One is to apply the lubricant to the O-ring using your fingers, your hand or a brush. Another is to dip the O-ring into a container of the lubricant. A third method commonly used is to dispense the O-ring lubricant into the seal packaging and use what we call the “shake and bake” method.

The common goal of all of these different lubrication methods is to have a thin uniform film applied to the entire surface of the O-ring when completed. This will ease installation and provide best friction reduction.


Gallagher Fluid Seals is a Parker Authorized Distributor, with thousands of o-rings stocked at all times.  If you have any questions about o-rings, material compatibility, failure modes, etc, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Part Identification Technologies

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.
Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


Protect Your Seal Aftermarket with Part Identification Technologies

Protect Your Seal Aftermarket with Part Identification TechnologiesParker is revolutionizing part identification technology with a multitude of options. Customers are able to benefit from various identification methods such as non-permanent and permanent part markings by selecting their part number and company logo on the seal. For more advanced identification, a customer may opt to use the Parker Tracking System or utilize our RFID seals for tracking purposes. These identification methods ensure product authenticity and reduce seal installation errors by providing visual indicators for the assembly process.

Basic part marking – non-permanent identification

Non-permanent markings are applied to the surface of the seal and can be in the form of a company logo, unique part number, barcode, or other seal information. Non-permanent markings ensure Parker’s part origin, enables part level traceability and provides an easily visible cue to operators. This value-added feature helps reduce installation errors in addition to protecting customers against counterfeit seals.

Continue reading Part Identification Technologies

New Sealing Material HiFluor® FB

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.
Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


New Sealing Material HiFluor® FB for Hygienically Sensitive Applications

HiFluor® FB - Hygienically Sensitive Sealing MaterialBe it in the production of food, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics or medical devices coming into contact with the human body, excellent purity and media resistance combined with a wide range of robust properties is always required of the materials used for the components in the manufacturing processes. Specifically for these challenging applications, Parker has developed a new sealing compound with very good mechanical properties and excellent permanent elasticity: HiFluor® FB V8991.

Fluoroelastomeric materials have proven their viability in chemical and food processing, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and life science applications involving non-polar solvents, aliphatic compounds, greases, oils and aromatic substances whenever the resistance of standard materials such as hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and ethylene propylene rubber (EPDM) is no longer sufficient.

Innovative “Pure” Sealing Solution HiFluor® FB V8991

As a compound and seal manufacturer, Parker Prädifa, in the light of the growing demands made on sealing elements in the aforementioned markets, has developed a HiFluor® FB compound with very good mechanical properties and excellent permanent elasticity.

Continue reading New Sealing Material HiFluor® FB

Sealing Materials for Food Applications

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.
Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


A Guide to Selecting the Proper Sealing Material for Food Applications

Food ApplicationsThe substances used in the food and in the chemical process industries are identical in many cases, whether they are of natural origin or synthetically produced.  Irrespective of their type and occurrence – be it in process media, in raw materials for products or in finished products – the materials for seals and engineered components used in production equipment coming into contact with diverse chemical substances have to meet specific purity requirements and be resistant to chemicals under the given process conditions. Purity and stability are therefore basic prerequisites for materials in the chemical process industry and the food industry. The challenge lies in selecting the proper sealing material for an application.

Top Priorities: Consumer Health and Safety

Consumer health and safety are of paramount importance in food, beverage and pharmaceutical production processes. Therefore, the materials have to comply with specific legal requirements and standards, depending on their application. The harmlessness of the materials for the intended uses, such as applications involving contact with foodstuffs and drinking water, must have been certified by relevant approvals and conformities. Equally important to consumer safety is that the materials are free of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), phthalates, mineral oil based plasticizers and animal derived ingredients (ADI).

Continue reading Sealing Materials for Food Applications

How to Read a Rubber Test Report

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.
Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


4 Most Common Rubber Test Report Misunderstandings

4 Most Common Rubber Test Report MisunderstandingsWe’ve all done it at least once: looked at a rubber test report, read the numbers on it, and come up with exactly the wrong conclusion. Pass / fail limits and results are printed right there, but for some reason, our brain just misinterprets the two. It’s a passing value, but for some reason, we think it shows a failure instead. Imagine a police officer writing a speeding ticket for driving 53 MPH on a road with a 55 MPH speed limit.

It’s not a problem with the test itself, it’s a problem of interpretation. That means the old carpenter’s adage, “measure once, cut twice; measure twice, cut once” doesn’t address the issue. The same issue of misunderstanding the values on a test report occurs in the rubber seal industry about once a month. Passing results are misinterpreted to be failing results, and good values are thought to be bad ones. Here are four of the most common rubber test report misunderstandings I’ve run into.

Continue reading How to Read a Rubber Test Report

New FFKM Extends Seal Life

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.
Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


Solving Long Time Industry Problem

Compression Set Resistance - FFKM ULTRA FF156

For several years, one of the biggest drawbacks of “chemically resistant” FFKMs, or perfluoroelastomers, has been their relatively poor compression set resistance. Typically, compounding these materials to be extremely resistant to many different chemical environments comes with the drawback of having to give up their ability to resist taking a set after being under high temperatures for an extended period. Parker’s solution to this industry challenge is ULTRA FF156.

Best in class compression set resistance

Compression set refers to a common failure mode of elastomers where a seal permanently flattens out while in application and the joint begins to leak. A material’s resistance to this permanent deformation can be easily tested in the lab. To do so, a seal’s thickness is measured, then that seal is compressed about 25% before being heated in an oven at a particular temperature for a predetermined amount of time. That seal is then removed from the oven and the thickness is remeasured.

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Using an O-Ring in Non-Circular Grooves

Article re-posted with permission from Parker Hannifin Sealing & Shielding Team.  Original content can be found on Parker’s Blog.


O-Ring Racetrack Groove

Can O-rings be used in rectangular or non-circular groove patterns? This question comes up weekly, and the answer is a resounding “Yes!” however there are definite guidelines we want to follow. A non-circular face seal footprint might also be called a racetrack groove, a wandering groove or a custom plan view. When using an O-ring, the main design consideration is the corner or smallest radius (shown “r” in diagram). The inside radius should be at least three times the O-ring cross sectional diameter. In a perfect world, six times greater is even better. What we want to avoid is over-stressing the O-ring around the bend, or causing a corner crease which increases likelihood of corner leakage. Designing the radius at six times the cross section will minimize the bending stress, resulting in increased service life.

Continue reading Using an O-Ring in Non-Circular Grooves